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Caffeine Is Good for Your Heart, Study Suggests

Caffeine Is Good for Your Heart, Study Suggests


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Researchers recommend 3 cups of coffee a day at most

kenzaza / istockphoto.com

The study's authors suggest drinking only 300 milligrams of caffeine per day.

The best study ever is finally here, and it claims that caffeine might actually be good for your heart. According to ABC News, new research in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology states that the stimulant isn’t as damaging as some suggest.

When you drink caffeine, you usually get a burst of energy and your heart beats at a higher pace, which is one reason why it’s been assumed to be unhealthy for the heart. Many studies also link caffeine to atrial fibrillation, a common heart rhythm disorder that affects an estimated 2.7 to 6.1 million people in America, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Atrial fibrillation can cause chest pain, shortness of breath, and even a stroke.

In this new study, researchers are suggesting that caffeine actually protects people from atrial fibrillation. Here’s the catch: They don’t recommend more than 300 milligrams of caffeine per day. This equates to about three cups of coffee, one less than the Mayo Clinic’s suggested daily intake. Furthermore, the study’s authors suggest sticking to coffee and tea, because when you enter the energy drink zone, things can get a little tricky, as those drinks have other ingredients that can unhealthily amplify caffeine’s effects.

Well, what are you waiting for? Cheers to this good news with a steaming brew from one of the best coffee chains in America.


Study Suggests Coffee May Be Associated With Reduced Risk Of Heart Disease

Here's some more great news for the coffee lovers out there: There's yet another study suggesting that your morning cup of joe might actually come with some health benefits you didn't even know about. In addition to warding off dementia, helping you live longer, and keeping you pumped during your morning workout, drinking coffee might also be good for your heart health, according to preliminary research recently presented to the American Heart Association.

Researchers from the University of Colorado said that they came across the information while looking over data from the Framingham Heart Study, which has looked at the eating patterns and cardiovascular health of around 15,000 Americans since the 1940s. They originally dug through the data with hopes of finding eating habits that might reduce the risk of heart disease and stroke, but seemingly ended up finding something a little more interesting.

According to the findings, drinking coffee was linked to a reduced risk for heart failure, stroke, and coronary heart disease. Subjects who drank an 8-ounce cup of coffee every day found that the risks for these conditions were reduced by 7%, 8% and 5%, respectively. These findings were confirmed by the researchers later on when they analyzed the same patterns in studies similar to the Framingham Heart Study &mdash the Cardiovascular Heart Study and the Atherosclerosis Risk In Communities Study.

Of course it's worth noting, per a release from the AHA, that the information only suggests that there's a link between coffee consumption and overall heart health, not a "cause-and-effect" relationship. It's also worth noting that these findings have yet to be peer-reviewed, though there's still other research out there suggesting that the level of caffeine in coffee combined with its antioxidants and anti-inflammatory properties can ward off a slew of health problems.


Study Suggests Coffee May Be Associated With Reduced Risk Of Heart Disease

Here's some more great news for the coffee lovers out there: There's yet another study suggesting that your morning cup of joe might actually come with some health benefits you didn't even know about. In addition to warding off dementia, helping you live longer, and keeping you pumped during your morning workout, drinking coffee might also be good for your heart health, according to preliminary research recently presented to the American Heart Association.

Researchers from the University of Colorado said that they came across the information while looking over data from the Framingham Heart Study, which has looked at the eating patterns and cardiovascular health of around 15,000 Americans since the 1940s. They originally dug through the data with hopes of finding eating habits that might reduce the risk of heart disease and stroke, but seemingly ended up finding something a little more interesting.

According to the findings, drinking coffee was linked to a reduced risk for heart failure, stroke, and coronary heart disease. Subjects who drank an 8-ounce cup of coffee every day found that the risks for these conditions were reduced by 7%, 8% and 5%, respectively. These findings were confirmed by the researchers later on when they analyzed the same patterns in studies similar to the Framingham Heart Study &mdash the Cardiovascular Heart Study and the Atherosclerosis Risk In Communities Study.

Of course it's worth noting, per a release from the AHA, that the information only suggests that there's a link between coffee consumption and overall heart health, not a "cause-and-effect" relationship. It's also worth noting that these findings have yet to be peer-reviewed, though there's still other research out there suggesting that the level of caffeine in coffee combined with its antioxidants and anti-inflammatory properties can ward off a slew of health problems.


Study Suggests Coffee May Be Associated With Reduced Risk Of Heart Disease

Here's some more great news for the coffee lovers out there: There's yet another study suggesting that your morning cup of joe might actually come with some health benefits you didn't even know about. In addition to warding off dementia, helping you live longer, and keeping you pumped during your morning workout, drinking coffee might also be good for your heart health, according to preliminary research recently presented to the American Heart Association.

Researchers from the University of Colorado said that they came across the information while looking over data from the Framingham Heart Study, which has looked at the eating patterns and cardiovascular health of around 15,000 Americans since the 1940s. They originally dug through the data with hopes of finding eating habits that might reduce the risk of heart disease and stroke, but seemingly ended up finding something a little more interesting.

According to the findings, drinking coffee was linked to a reduced risk for heart failure, stroke, and coronary heart disease. Subjects who drank an 8-ounce cup of coffee every day found that the risks for these conditions were reduced by 7%, 8% and 5%, respectively. These findings were confirmed by the researchers later on when they analyzed the same patterns in studies similar to the Framingham Heart Study &mdash the Cardiovascular Heart Study and the Atherosclerosis Risk In Communities Study.

Of course it's worth noting, per a release from the AHA, that the information only suggests that there's a link between coffee consumption and overall heart health, not a "cause-and-effect" relationship. It's also worth noting that these findings have yet to be peer-reviewed, though there's still other research out there suggesting that the level of caffeine in coffee combined with its antioxidants and anti-inflammatory properties can ward off a slew of health problems.


Study Suggests Coffee May Be Associated With Reduced Risk Of Heart Disease

Here's some more great news for the coffee lovers out there: There's yet another study suggesting that your morning cup of joe might actually come with some health benefits you didn't even know about. In addition to warding off dementia, helping you live longer, and keeping you pumped during your morning workout, drinking coffee might also be good for your heart health, according to preliminary research recently presented to the American Heart Association.

Researchers from the University of Colorado said that they came across the information while looking over data from the Framingham Heart Study, which has looked at the eating patterns and cardiovascular health of around 15,000 Americans since the 1940s. They originally dug through the data with hopes of finding eating habits that might reduce the risk of heart disease and stroke, but seemingly ended up finding something a little more interesting.

According to the findings, drinking coffee was linked to a reduced risk for heart failure, stroke, and coronary heart disease. Subjects who drank an 8-ounce cup of coffee every day found that the risks for these conditions were reduced by 7%, 8% and 5%, respectively. These findings were confirmed by the researchers later on when they analyzed the same patterns in studies similar to the Framingham Heart Study &mdash the Cardiovascular Heart Study and the Atherosclerosis Risk In Communities Study.

Of course it's worth noting, per a release from the AHA, that the information only suggests that there's a link between coffee consumption and overall heart health, not a "cause-and-effect" relationship. It's also worth noting that these findings have yet to be peer-reviewed, though there's still other research out there suggesting that the level of caffeine in coffee combined with its antioxidants and anti-inflammatory properties can ward off a slew of health problems.


Study Suggests Coffee May Be Associated With Reduced Risk Of Heart Disease

Here's some more great news for the coffee lovers out there: There's yet another study suggesting that your morning cup of joe might actually come with some health benefits you didn't even know about. In addition to warding off dementia, helping you live longer, and keeping you pumped during your morning workout, drinking coffee might also be good for your heart health, according to preliminary research recently presented to the American Heart Association.

Researchers from the University of Colorado said that they came across the information while looking over data from the Framingham Heart Study, which has looked at the eating patterns and cardiovascular health of around 15,000 Americans since the 1940s. They originally dug through the data with hopes of finding eating habits that might reduce the risk of heart disease and stroke, but seemingly ended up finding something a little more interesting.

According to the findings, drinking coffee was linked to a reduced risk for heart failure, stroke, and coronary heart disease. Subjects who drank an 8-ounce cup of coffee every day found that the risks for these conditions were reduced by 7%, 8% and 5%, respectively. These findings were confirmed by the researchers later on when they analyzed the same patterns in studies similar to the Framingham Heart Study &mdash the Cardiovascular Heart Study and the Atherosclerosis Risk In Communities Study.

Of course it's worth noting, per a release from the AHA, that the information only suggests that there's a link between coffee consumption and overall heart health, not a "cause-and-effect" relationship. It's also worth noting that these findings have yet to be peer-reviewed, though there's still other research out there suggesting that the level of caffeine in coffee combined with its antioxidants and anti-inflammatory properties can ward off a slew of health problems.


Study Suggests Coffee May Be Associated With Reduced Risk Of Heart Disease

Here's some more great news for the coffee lovers out there: There's yet another study suggesting that your morning cup of joe might actually come with some health benefits you didn't even know about. In addition to warding off dementia, helping you live longer, and keeping you pumped during your morning workout, drinking coffee might also be good for your heart health, according to preliminary research recently presented to the American Heart Association.

Researchers from the University of Colorado said that they came across the information while looking over data from the Framingham Heart Study, which has looked at the eating patterns and cardiovascular health of around 15,000 Americans since the 1940s. They originally dug through the data with hopes of finding eating habits that might reduce the risk of heart disease and stroke, but seemingly ended up finding something a little more interesting.

According to the findings, drinking coffee was linked to a reduced risk for heart failure, stroke, and coronary heart disease. Subjects who drank an 8-ounce cup of coffee every day found that the risks for these conditions were reduced by 7%, 8% and 5%, respectively. These findings were confirmed by the researchers later on when they analyzed the same patterns in studies similar to the Framingham Heart Study &mdash the Cardiovascular Heart Study and the Atherosclerosis Risk In Communities Study.

Of course it's worth noting, per a release from the AHA, that the information only suggests that there's a link between coffee consumption and overall heart health, not a "cause-and-effect" relationship. It's also worth noting that these findings have yet to be peer-reviewed, though there's still other research out there suggesting that the level of caffeine in coffee combined with its antioxidants and anti-inflammatory properties can ward off a slew of health problems.


Study Suggests Coffee May Be Associated With Reduced Risk Of Heart Disease

Here's some more great news for the coffee lovers out there: There's yet another study suggesting that your morning cup of joe might actually come with some health benefits you didn't even know about. In addition to warding off dementia, helping you live longer, and keeping you pumped during your morning workout, drinking coffee might also be good for your heart health, according to preliminary research recently presented to the American Heart Association.

Researchers from the University of Colorado said that they came across the information while looking over data from the Framingham Heart Study, which has looked at the eating patterns and cardiovascular health of around 15,000 Americans since the 1940s. They originally dug through the data with hopes of finding eating habits that might reduce the risk of heart disease and stroke, but seemingly ended up finding something a little more interesting.

According to the findings, drinking coffee was linked to a reduced risk for heart failure, stroke, and coronary heart disease. Subjects who drank an 8-ounce cup of coffee every day found that the risks for these conditions were reduced by 7%, 8% and 5%, respectively. These findings were confirmed by the researchers later on when they analyzed the same patterns in studies similar to the Framingham Heart Study &mdash the Cardiovascular Heart Study and the Atherosclerosis Risk In Communities Study.

Of course it's worth noting, per a release from the AHA, that the information only suggests that there's a link between coffee consumption and overall heart health, not a "cause-and-effect" relationship. It's also worth noting that these findings have yet to be peer-reviewed, though there's still other research out there suggesting that the level of caffeine in coffee combined with its antioxidants and anti-inflammatory properties can ward off a slew of health problems.


Study Suggests Coffee May Be Associated With Reduced Risk Of Heart Disease

Here's some more great news for the coffee lovers out there: There's yet another study suggesting that your morning cup of joe might actually come with some health benefits you didn't even know about. In addition to warding off dementia, helping you live longer, and keeping you pumped during your morning workout, drinking coffee might also be good for your heart health, according to preliminary research recently presented to the American Heart Association.

Researchers from the University of Colorado said that they came across the information while looking over data from the Framingham Heart Study, which has looked at the eating patterns and cardiovascular health of around 15,000 Americans since the 1940s. They originally dug through the data with hopes of finding eating habits that might reduce the risk of heart disease and stroke, but seemingly ended up finding something a little more interesting.

According to the findings, drinking coffee was linked to a reduced risk for heart failure, stroke, and coronary heart disease. Subjects who drank an 8-ounce cup of coffee every day found that the risks for these conditions were reduced by 7%, 8% and 5%, respectively. These findings were confirmed by the researchers later on when they analyzed the same patterns in studies similar to the Framingham Heart Study &mdash the Cardiovascular Heart Study and the Atherosclerosis Risk In Communities Study.

Of course it's worth noting, per a release from the AHA, that the information only suggests that there's a link between coffee consumption and overall heart health, not a "cause-and-effect" relationship. It's also worth noting that these findings have yet to be peer-reviewed, though there's still other research out there suggesting that the level of caffeine in coffee combined with its antioxidants and anti-inflammatory properties can ward off a slew of health problems.


Study Suggests Coffee May Be Associated With Reduced Risk Of Heart Disease

Here's some more great news for the coffee lovers out there: There's yet another study suggesting that your morning cup of joe might actually come with some health benefits you didn't even know about. In addition to warding off dementia, helping you live longer, and keeping you pumped during your morning workout, drinking coffee might also be good for your heart health, according to preliminary research recently presented to the American Heart Association.

Researchers from the University of Colorado said that they came across the information while looking over data from the Framingham Heart Study, which has looked at the eating patterns and cardiovascular health of around 15,000 Americans since the 1940s. They originally dug through the data with hopes of finding eating habits that might reduce the risk of heart disease and stroke, but seemingly ended up finding something a little more interesting.

According to the findings, drinking coffee was linked to a reduced risk for heart failure, stroke, and coronary heart disease. Subjects who drank an 8-ounce cup of coffee every day found that the risks for these conditions were reduced by 7%, 8% and 5%, respectively. These findings were confirmed by the researchers later on when they analyzed the same patterns in studies similar to the Framingham Heart Study &mdash the Cardiovascular Heart Study and the Atherosclerosis Risk In Communities Study.

Of course it's worth noting, per a release from the AHA, that the information only suggests that there's a link between coffee consumption and overall heart health, not a "cause-and-effect" relationship. It's also worth noting that these findings have yet to be peer-reviewed, though there's still other research out there suggesting that the level of caffeine in coffee combined with its antioxidants and anti-inflammatory properties can ward off a slew of health problems.


Study Suggests Coffee May Be Associated With Reduced Risk Of Heart Disease

Here's some more great news for the coffee lovers out there: There's yet another study suggesting that your morning cup of joe might actually come with some health benefits you didn't even know about. In addition to warding off dementia, helping you live longer, and keeping you pumped during your morning workout, drinking coffee might also be good for your heart health, according to preliminary research recently presented to the American Heart Association.

Researchers from the University of Colorado said that they came across the information while looking over data from the Framingham Heart Study, which has looked at the eating patterns and cardiovascular health of around 15,000 Americans since the 1940s. They originally dug through the data with hopes of finding eating habits that might reduce the risk of heart disease and stroke, but seemingly ended up finding something a little more interesting.

According to the findings, drinking coffee was linked to a reduced risk for heart failure, stroke, and coronary heart disease. Subjects who drank an 8-ounce cup of coffee every day found that the risks for these conditions were reduced by 7%, 8% and 5%, respectively. These findings were confirmed by the researchers later on when they analyzed the same patterns in studies similar to the Framingham Heart Study &mdash the Cardiovascular Heart Study and the Atherosclerosis Risk In Communities Study.

Of course it's worth noting, per a release from the AHA, that the information only suggests that there's a link between coffee consumption and overall heart health, not a "cause-and-effect" relationship. It's also worth noting that these findings have yet to be peer-reviewed, though there's still other research out there suggesting that the level of caffeine in coffee combined with its antioxidants and anti-inflammatory properties can ward off a slew of health problems.