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Portion Control: How Much Is Too Much?

Portion Control: How Much Is Too Much?


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Most restaurants are serving double and triple times the amount of food we should be eating for a balanced diet, and these supersized portions are producing supersized waistlines. We are getting so used to these unrealistic portions that our “healthy” home cooked meals are starting to triple in size, meaning that “supersized” is sadly becoming the norm. Even though you might be choosing healthy foods, too much of a good thing can sabotage your weight-loss goals.

We all know lasting weight-loss comes from balancing the amount of calories you take in with the amount you burn. When it comes to making sure you stay within your allotted calories while still eating a balanced diet, properly portioning your meals is key! Here are some easy tricks to help you gain control of your portion distortion and set you up for a successful slim down!

“I Know I Need Protein, but How Much?”
Protein is where it’s at when it comes to weight-loss, muscle development, bone density, brain health, better sleep, and lowering blood pressure. To reap all of its badass benefits, you are going to want to get 25 to 35 percent of your daily calories from protein. Of course, everyone’s intake will vary according to weight and activity level, but the DRI (Dietary Reference Intake) is 0.36 grams per pound. Now I know you are not walking around with a food scale, so this info is pretty much useless when you are at your favorite restaurant staring down at that massive piece of steak. However, the “handiest” tool for measuring portion size is actually the palm of your hand. In fact, three to four ounces of protein is equal to the size of your palm or a deck of cards.

Mom Was Right When She Told You to Eat Your Vegetables
I am a firm believer that you can never eat too many vegetables. No one ever got fat by eating too much broccoli. When it comes to vegetables, I throw the limits out the window and allow myself as much as I want. Vegetables are stocked with vitamins, nutrients, and fiber and are extremely low in calories. They give you the greatest bang for your buck when it comes to your daily caloric intake. Basically, they fill you up without filling you out. Because of this, I like to cover half of my plate with vegetables. If you fill up on your greens, you are much less likely to overeat.

The Low-Down on Carbs
If weight loss is your goal, you are going to want to limit the amount of refined carbohydrates in your diet and stick to “whole” or “complex” carbs. Refined carbohydrate foods such as white bread, pasta, white rice, and pastries lack essential nutrients and are basically empty calories. They also send your blood sugar levels on a roller coaster ride, which causes energy crashes and sugar cravings. Whole carbs such as potatoes, legumes, and whole grains are loaded with nutrients and fiber, and don’t cause the same spikes and dips in blood sugar levels. They give you sustained energy and have positive effects on the metabolism. However, even when sticking to complex carbs, you still need to watch your portions because it is very easy to overdo it in today’s carb-loving culture! The average carbohydrate intake for a healthy person that engages in high-intensity exercise should be one to three grams per pound of body weight. When portioning out my meals, I like to remember that a one-half cup serving of grains is equal to the size of my fist. Any more than a fistful deserves a doggy bag!

Use Fat (in Moderation) to Burn Fat!
Monounsaturated fats are super stars when it comes to benefiting your overall health. Found in foods such as olive oil, avocado, almonds, and seeds, these fabulous fats can improve heart health and boost brain power. They also help to satiate you and stabilize blood sugar levels which can lead to weight-loss. However, it’s easy to consume too much if you’re not careful! At nine calories per gram, fat has the most calories of all the macronutrients. In a healthy diet, about 30 percent of total daily calories should come from fat. When preparing your meals, keep those portions in check by sticking to one thumb tip (knuckle to tip) of oils, one cupped handful of nuts, one full thumb of nut butter, or half of an avocado.

Knowledge is power when it comes to maintaining your healthy lifestyle. By eating the proper portions you can eliminate hundreds of unwanted calories each day! Now go out there and lose weight by lightening your plate!

Jennifer Leah Gottlieb is certified as a personal trainer and weight-loss specialist by The National Academy of Sports Medicine. She built a successful business training a large roster of celebrities and many of Manhattan's elite. Jen has a knack for designing healthy meal plans, and she has helped clients lose hundreds of pounds throughout her career.


Saucing Food – How Much Is Enough

At restaurants, where food cost is king, the difference between 1 ounce and 3 ounces of sauce on a dish translates to cash for the restaurant. No matter what type of restaurant, portion control is a key to quality, consistency and revenue.

At McDonald’s they have a special condiment “portioner” that deposits exactly the same amount of ketchup and/or mustard on each and every burger. At other restaurants, portions are controlled through weighing and applying sauces and dressings with calibrated ladles (1/2 oz, 1 oz, 2 oz, etc).

The point is that, when you go to a restaurant, the amount of sauce and/or dressing that comes with your meal, be it osso bucco, spaghetti with marinara, or a mixed green salad, is accounted for down to the ounce.

The goal, of course, is to give each customer the “perfect amount” of sauce or dressing while keeping a tight handle on cost. This means that you, as the consumer, have very little control over the amount of sauce that arrives with your food.

This is not generally a bad thing, as most chefs will try to serve what they think is a reasonable amount of sauce, and that quantity appeals to the vast majority of diners. The trouble comes in if you are a person who either likes their salad, for instance, either swimming in dressing or dry.

Most restaurants can accommodate your requests by giving you dressing on the side or sending the plate out with double dressing. Don’t be surprised if you are charged extra for that dressing. Remember, food cost is king, and dressings are not free.

Fortunately, the goal of this book is to teach you how to make restaurant quality sauces at home. And when you cook at home, you of course have much more control over the amount of sauce that you serve with each dish.

Keeping in mind that it is easier to under-sauce and pass more at the table than it is to over-sauce and leave your guests wringing out their lettuce, there are some guidelines that are helpful when it comes to deciding how much sauce, gravy or salad dressing you are going to make to serve with your meal.

Many prestigious culinary schools, including the Culinary Institute of America, recommend a sauce serving of 2 ounces. This amount supposes a standard portion size for whatever is being sauced, too. Most of the recipes in this book serve four diners and yield one cup of sauce (2 ounces per diner) as per the CIA guidelines.

When considering whether or not to make additional sauce, think about what other dishes you’ll be serving and whether people might want to sauce those dishes as well. It is important to remember that, at the end of the day, you can provide as much or as little sauce as you deem appropriate for whatever dish you are serving.

That’s a pretty vague rule of thumb, so let’s take a look at the different types of foods that might require sauce and try to pin down some rules for each type.

How Much Sauce Should You Put On Pasta

In Italy, pasta is sauced with restraint, and the sauce serves to enhance and complement the flavor and texture of the pasta. In the United States, we are much more likely to use more sauce than the Italians.

It’s not that Americans waste sauce after all, that’s what garlic bread is for.

If you are going to serve pasta as a main course and also provide bread for “sopping,” a good rule of thumb is equal amounts of pasta and sauce. Four ounces of pasta, four ounces (roughly half a cup) of sauce.

If you are serving pasta and you just want the sauce to coat each piece without pooling on the plate, shoot for 2-3 ounces of sauce per 4 ounce serving of pasta.

How Much Sauce Should You Put On Salad

Contrary to what some children might think, salad dressing is not there to cover up the taste of the vegetables in a salad. A well-dressed salad maintains a nice balance between greens, vegetables and dressing.

The classic rule for dressing a salad is that each piece of lettuce be lightly coated with the dressing with none pooling on the plate.

Think of that all-you-can-eat soup/salad/breadstick meal at a popular chain Italian restaurant. Everyone seems to love their salads, and there is never any dressing pooled in the bottom of the serving bowl. That is a perfectly dressed salad.

If you are serving a large tossed salad that you are dressing and then passing, drizzle about an ounce of dressing per diner over the salad and then toss thoroughly, either with clean (or gloved) hands or with salad tongs. Pass extra at the table to satisfy anyone who likes a bit more dressing.

If you are serving individual salads, it is best to defer to your guests and leave the salads undressed and pass the dressing at the table. In that case, make sure that you have at least 2 ounces of dressing per diner to accommodate those of your guests who like to go a little heavy on the dressing.

How Much Sauce Should You Put On Protein (Meat/Poultry/Fish)

The rule of thumb for saucing proteins is one to two ounces, depending upon who you ask or what book you read. Of course, that doesn’t take into account what type of sauce is being served. The more flavorful and/or concentrated your sauce, the less you need.

If you are serving a reduction sauce, you may only need one ounce per serving. If you are serving a lightly-flavored sauce with fish or poultry, you will probably want to serve 2 ounces per serving.

On the other hand, if you are saucing with a compound butter, you might only need half an ounce. In all of these cases, though, it is advisable to have extra for passing at the table.

Appearances Make a Difference

At restaurants, plating the main protein can be a pretty elaborate affair involving squirt bottles, paint brushes and or spoons for precise saucing. The home cook can certainly find and use these items for plating, but generally there are three saucing options available to us without having to go to the restaurant supply or craft store.

  • Dipping the meat in/brushing the sauce on. Think barbecued ribs or chicken. In this case, the sauce is thick enough to coat the meat, so to serve all the cook has to do is dip the meat in the sauce and place it on the plate.
  • Pouring sauce over the meat. This one is easy: just put the meat on the plate and then ladle or pour the sauce on top.
  • Saucing the plate. This is probably the type of plating most closely associated with restaurants. Pour a pool of sauce in the center of the plate and then place the protein on top.

Of the three options, the second option is the only one that you might not have to pass extra sauce at the table. And all the rules can change if you are serving a meal with several side dishes, some of which people like to sauce.

Consider the Thanksgiving meal. I don’t know anyone who only sauces their meat. Gravy goes on everything from mashed potatoes to stuffing to green beans.

So, keep in mind the side dishes you are serving. If you’re serving a mushroom gravy with beef and some type of potato as a side dish, it’s almost guaranteed that everyone is going to want gravy on the potatoes, as well.

In the case of side dishes that beg for gravy, try to shoot for 2 ounces of gravy per diner per dish. So, if you are serving 6 diners and there are two dishes that need to be sauced, you’ll want to have at least 4 ounces of sauce per diner, or 24 ounces.

Again, everyone’s taste is different, and the amount of sauce you choose to make/serve along with a dish is a very subjective decision. Often, it might come down to how much sauce the recipe makes.

If there is any left over, you can serve extra. If there isn’t, then you can’t. And, at the end of the day, if you’re serving good food to good friends and family, most people are not going to lose any sleep over an ounce or two of sauce.


Saucing Food – How Much Is Enough

At restaurants, where food cost is king, the difference between 1 ounce and 3 ounces of sauce on a dish translates to cash for the restaurant. No matter what type of restaurant, portion control is a key to quality, consistency and revenue.

At McDonald’s they have a special condiment “portioner” that deposits exactly the same amount of ketchup and/or mustard on each and every burger. At other restaurants, portions are controlled through weighing and applying sauces and dressings with calibrated ladles (1/2 oz, 1 oz, 2 oz, etc).

The point is that, when you go to a restaurant, the amount of sauce and/or dressing that comes with your meal, be it osso bucco, spaghetti with marinara, or a mixed green salad, is accounted for down to the ounce.

The goal, of course, is to give each customer the “perfect amount” of sauce or dressing while keeping a tight handle on cost. This means that you, as the consumer, have very little control over the amount of sauce that arrives with your food.

This is not generally a bad thing, as most chefs will try to serve what they think is a reasonable amount of sauce, and that quantity appeals to the vast majority of diners. The trouble comes in if you are a person who either likes their salad, for instance, either swimming in dressing or dry.

Most restaurants can accommodate your requests by giving you dressing on the side or sending the plate out with double dressing. Don’t be surprised if you are charged extra for that dressing. Remember, food cost is king, and dressings are not free.

Fortunately, the goal of this book is to teach you how to make restaurant quality sauces at home. And when you cook at home, you of course have much more control over the amount of sauce that you serve with each dish.

Keeping in mind that it is easier to under-sauce and pass more at the table than it is to over-sauce and leave your guests wringing out their lettuce, there are some guidelines that are helpful when it comes to deciding how much sauce, gravy or salad dressing you are going to make to serve with your meal.

Many prestigious culinary schools, including the Culinary Institute of America, recommend a sauce serving of 2 ounces. This amount supposes a standard portion size for whatever is being sauced, too. Most of the recipes in this book serve four diners and yield one cup of sauce (2 ounces per diner) as per the CIA guidelines.

When considering whether or not to make additional sauce, think about what other dishes you’ll be serving and whether people might want to sauce those dishes as well. It is important to remember that, at the end of the day, you can provide as much or as little sauce as you deem appropriate for whatever dish you are serving.

That’s a pretty vague rule of thumb, so let’s take a look at the different types of foods that might require sauce and try to pin down some rules for each type.

How Much Sauce Should You Put On Pasta

In Italy, pasta is sauced with restraint, and the sauce serves to enhance and complement the flavor and texture of the pasta. In the United States, we are much more likely to use more sauce than the Italians.

It’s not that Americans waste sauce after all, that’s what garlic bread is for.

If you are going to serve pasta as a main course and also provide bread for “sopping,” a good rule of thumb is equal amounts of pasta and sauce. Four ounces of pasta, four ounces (roughly half a cup) of sauce.

If you are serving pasta and you just want the sauce to coat each piece without pooling on the plate, shoot for 2-3 ounces of sauce per 4 ounce serving of pasta.

How Much Sauce Should You Put On Salad

Contrary to what some children might think, salad dressing is not there to cover up the taste of the vegetables in a salad. A well-dressed salad maintains a nice balance between greens, vegetables and dressing.

The classic rule for dressing a salad is that each piece of lettuce be lightly coated with the dressing with none pooling on the plate.

Think of that all-you-can-eat soup/salad/breadstick meal at a popular chain Italian restaurant. Everyone seems to love their salads, and there is never any dressing pooled in the bottom of the serving bowl. That is a perfectly dressed salad.

If you are serving a large tossed salad that you are dressing and then passing, drizzle about an ounce of dressing per diner over the salad and then toss thoroughly, either with clean (or gloved) hands or with salad tongs. Pass extra at the table to satisfy anyone who likes a bit more dressing.

If you are serving individual salads, it is best to defer to your guests and leave the salads undressed and pass the dressing at the table. In that case, make sure that you have at least 2 ounces of dressing per diner to accommodate those of your guests who like to go a little heavy on the dressing.

How Much Sauce Should You Put On Protein (Meat/Poultry/Fish)

The rule of thumb for saucing proteins is one to two ounces, depending upon who you ask or what book you read. Of course, that doesn’t take into account what type of sauce is being served. The more flavorful and/or concentrated your sauce, the less you need.

If you are serving a reduction sauce, you may only need one ounce per serving. If you are serving a lightly-flavored sauce with fish or poultry, you will probably want to serve 2 ounces per serving.

On the other hand, if you are saucing with a compound butter, you might only need half an ounce. In all of these cases, though, it is advisable to have extra for passing at the table.

Appearances Make a Difference

At restaurants, plating the main protein can be a pretty elaborate affair involving squirt bottles, paint brushes and or spoons for precise saucing. The home cook can certainly find and use these items for plating, but generally there are three saucing options available to us without having to go to the restaurant supply or craft store.

  • Dipping the meat in/brushing the sauce on. Think barbecued ribs or chicken. In this case, the sauce is thick enough to coat the meat, so to serve all the cook has to do is dip the meat in the sauce and place it on the plate.
  • Pouring sauce over the meat. This one is easy: just put the meat on the plate and then ladle or pour the sauce on top.
  • Saucing the plate. This is probably the type of plating most closely associated with restaurants. Pour a pool of sauce in the center of the plate and then place the protein on top.

Of the three options, the second option is the only one that you might not have to pass extra sauce at the table. And all the rules can change if you are serving a meal with several side dishes, some of which people like to sauce.

Consider the Thanksgiving meal. I don’t know anyone who only sauces their meat. Gravy goes on everything from mashed potatoes to stuffing to green beans.

So, keep in mind the side dishes you are serving. If you’re serving a mushroom gravy with beef and some type of potato as a side dish, it’s almost guaranteed that everyone is going to want gravy on the potatoes, as well.

In the case of side dishes that beg for gravy, try to shoot for 2 ounces of gravy per diner per dish. So, if you are serving 6 diners and there are two dishes that need to be sauced, you’ll want to have at least 4 ounces of sauce per diner, or 24 ounces.

Again, everyone’s taste is different, and the amount of sauce you choose to make/serve along with a dish is a very subjective decision. Often, it might come down to how much sauce the recipe makes.

If there is any left over, you can serve extra. If there isn’t, then you can’t. And, at the end of the day, if you’re serving good food to good friends and family, most people are not going to lose any sleep over an ounce or two of sauce.


Saucing Food – How Much Is Enough

At restaurants, where food cost is king, the difference between 1 ounce and 3 ounces of sauce on a dish translates to cash for the restaurant. No matter what type of restaurant, portion control is a key to quality, consistency and revenue.

At McDonald’s they have a special condiment “portioner” that deposits exactly the same amount of ketchup and/or mustard on each and every burger. At other restaurants, portions are controlled through weighing and applying sauces and dressings with calibrated ladles (1/2 oz, 1 oz, 2 oz, etc).

The point is that, when you go to a restaurant, the amount of sauce and/or dressing that comes with your meal, be it osso bucco, spaghetti with marinara, or a mixed green salad, is accounted for down to the ounce.

The goal, of course, is to give each customer the “perfect amount” of sauce or dressing while keeping a tight handle on cost. This means that you, as the consumer, have very little control over the amount of sauce that arrives with your food.

This is not generally a bad thing, as most chefs will try to serve what they think is a reasonable amount of sauce, and that quantity appeals to the vast majority of diners. The trouble comes in if you are a person who either likes their salad, for instance, either swimming in dressing or dry.

Most restaurants can accommodate your requests by giving you dressing on the side or sending the plate out with double dressing. Don’t be surprised if you are charged extra for that dressing. Remember, food cost is king, and dressings are not free.

Fortunately, the goal of this book is to teach you how to make restaurant quality sauces at home. And when you cook at home, you of course have much more control over the amount of sauce that you serve with each dish.

Keeping in mind that it is easier to under-sauce and pass more at the table than it is to over-sauce and leave your guests wringing out their lettuce, there are some guidelines that are helpful when it comes to deciding how much sauce, gravy or salad dressing you are going to make to serve with your meal.

Many prestigious culinary schools, including the Culinary Institute of America, recommend a sauce serving of 2 ounces. This amount supposes a standard portion size for whatever is being sauced, too. Most of the recipes in this book serve four diners and yield one cup of sauce (2 ounces per diner) as per the CIA guidelines.

When considering whether or not to make additional sauce, think about what other dishes you’ll be serving and whether people might want to sauce those dishes as well. It is important to remember that, at the end of the day, you can provide as much or as little sauce as you deem appropriate for whatever dish you are serving.

That’s a pretty vague rule of thumb, so let’s take a look at the different types of foods that might require sauce and try to pin down some rules for each type.

How Much Sauce Should You Put On Pasta

In Italy, pasta is sauced with restraint, and the sauce serves to enhance and complement the flavor and texture of the pasta. In the United States, we are much more likely to use more sauce than the Italians.

It’s not that Americans waste sauce after all, that’s what garlic bread is for.

If you are going to serve pasta as a main course and also provide bread for “sopping,” a good rule of thumb is equal amounts of pasta and sauce. Four ounces of pasta, four ounces (roughly half a cup) of sauce.

If you are serving pasta and you just want the sauce to coat each piece without pooling on the plate, shoot for 2-3 ounces of sauce per 4 ounce serving of pasta.

How Much Sauce Should You Put On Salad

Contrary to what some children might think, salad dressing is not there to cover up the taste of the vegetables in a salad. A well-dressed salad maintains a nice balance between greens, vegetables and dressing.

The classic rule for dressing a salad is that each piece of lettuce be lightly coated with the dressing with none pooling on the plate.

Think of that all-you-can-eat soup/salad/breadstick meal at a popular chain Italian restaurant. Everyone seems to love their salads, and there is never any dressing pooled in the bottom of the serving bowl. That is a perfectly dressed salad.

If you are serving a large tossed salad that you are dressing and then passing, drizzle about an ounce of dressing per diner over the salad and then toss thoroughly, either with clean (or gloved) hands or with salad tongs. Pass extra at the table to satisfy anyone who likes a bit more dressing.

If you are serving individual salads, it is best to defer to your guests and leave the salads undressed and pass the dressing at the table. In that case, make sure that you have at least 2 ounces of dressing per diner to accommodate those of your guests who like to go a little heavy on the dressing.

How Much Sauce Should You Put On Protein (Meat/Poultry/Fish)

The rule of thumb for saucing proteins is one to two ounces, depending upon who you ask or what book you read. Of course, that doesn’t take into account what type of sauce is being served. The more flavorful and/or concentrated your sauce, the less you need.

If you are serving a reduction sauce, you may only need one ounce per serving. If you are serving a lightly-flavored sauce with fish or poultry, you will probably want to serve 2 ounces per serving.

On the other hand, if you are saucing with a compound butter, you might only need half an ounce. In all of these cases, though, it is advisable to have extra for passing at the table.

Appearances Make a Difference

At restaurants, plating the main protein can be a pretty elaborate affair involving squirt bottles, paint brushes and or spoons for precise saucing. The home cook can certainly find and use these items for plating, but generally there are three saucing options available to us without having to go to the restaurant supply or craft store.

  • Dipping the meat in/brushing the sauce on. Think barbecued ribs or chicken. In this case, the sauce is thick enough to coat the meat, so to serve all the cook has to do is dip the meat in the sauce and place it on the plate.
  • Pouring sauce over the meat. This one is easy: just put the meat on the plate and then ladle or pour the sauce on top.
  • Saucing the plate. This is probably the type of plating most closely associated with restaurants. Pour a pool of sauce in the center of the plate and then place the protein on top.

Of the three options, the second option is the only one that you might not have to pass extra sauce at the table. And all the rules can change if you are serving a meal with several side dishes, some of which people like to sauce.

Consider the Thanksgiving meal. I don’t know anyone who only sauces their meat. Gravy goes on everything from mashed potatoes to stuffing to green beans.

So, keep in mind the side dishes you are serving. If you’re serving a mushroom gravy with beef and some type of potato as a side dish, it’s almost guaranteed that everyone is going to want gravy on the potatoes, as well.

In the case of side dishes that beg for gravy, try to shoot for 2 ounces of gravy per diner per dish. So, if you are serving 6 diners and there are two dishes that need to be sauced, you’ll want to have at least 4 ounces of sauce per diner, or 24 ounces.

Again, everyone’s taste is different, and the amount of sauce you choose to make/serve along with a dish is a very subjective decision. Often, it might come down to how much sauce the recipe makes.

If there is any left over, you can serve extra. If there isn’t, then you can’t. And, at the end of the day, if you’re serving good food to good friends and family, most people are not going to lose any sleep over an ounce or two of sauce.


Saucing Food – How Much Is Enough

At restaurants, where food cost is king, the difference between 1 ounce and 3 ounces of sauce on a dish translates to cash for the restaurant. No matter what type of restaurant, portion control is a key to quality, consistency and revenue.

At McDonald’s they have a special condiment “portioner” that deposits exactly the same amount of ketchup and/or mustard on each and every burger. At other restaurants, portions are controlled through weighing and applying sauces and dressings with calibrated ladles (1/2 oz, 1 oz, 2 oz, etc).

The point is that, when you go to a restaurant, the amount of sauce and/or dressing that comes with your meal, be it osso bucco, spaghetti with marinara, or a mixed green salad, is accounted for down to the ounce.

The goal, of course, is to give each customer the “perfect amount” of sauce or dressing while keeping a tight handle on cost. This means that you, as the consumer, have very little control over the amount of sauce that arrives with your food.

This is not generally a bad thing, as most chefs will try to serve what they think is a reasonable amount of sauce, and that quantity appeals to the vast majority of diners. The trouble comes in if you are a person who either likes their salad, for instance, either swimming in dressing or dry.

Most restaurants can accommodate your requests by giving you dressing on the side or sending the plate out with double dressing. Don’t be surprised if you are charged extra for that dressing. Remember, food cost is king, and dressings are not free.

Fortunately, the goal of this book is to teach you how to make restaurant quality sauces at home. And when you cook at home, you of course have much more control over the amount of sauce that you serve with each dish.

Keeping in mind that it is easier to under-sauce and pass more at the table than it is to over-sauce and leave your guests wringing out their lettuce, there are some guidelines that are helpful when it comes to deciding how much sauce, gravy or salad dressing you are going to make to serve with your meal.

Many prestigious culinary schools, including the Culinary Institute of America, recommend a sauce serving of 2 ounces. This amount supposes a standard portion size for whatever is being sauced, too. Most of the recipes in this book serve four diners and yield one cup of sauce (2 ounces per diner) as per the CIA guidelines.

When considering whether or not to make additional sauce, think about what other dishes you’ll be serving and whether people might want to sauce those dishes as well. It is important to remember that, at the end of the day, you can provide as much or as little sauce as you deem appropriate for whatever dish you are serving.

That’s a pretty vague rule of thumb, so let’s take a look at the different types of foods that might require sauce and try to pin down some rules for each type.

How Much Sauce Should You Put On Pasta

In Italy, pasta is sauced with restraint, and the sauce serves to enhance and complement the flavor and texture of the pasta. In the United States, we are much more likely to use more sauce than the Italians.

It’s not that Americans waste sauce after all, that’s what garlic bread is for.

If you are going to serve pasta as a main course and also provide bread for “sopping,” a good rule of thumb is equal amounts of pasta and sauce. Four ounces of pasta, four ounces (roughly half a cup) of sauce.

If you are serving pasta and you just want the sauce to coat each piece without pooling on the plate, shoot for 2-3 ounces of sauce per 4 ounce serving of pasta.

How Much Sauce Should You Put On Salad

Contrary to what some children might think, salad dressing is not there to cover up the taste of the vegetables in a salad. A well-dressed salad maintains a nice balance between greens, vegetables and dressing.

The classic rule for dressing a salad is that each piece of lettuce be lightly coated with the dressing with none pooling on the plate.

Think of that all-you-can-eat soup/salad/breadstick meal at a popular chain Italian restaurant. Everyone seems to love their salads, and there is never any dressing pooled in the bottom of the serving bowl. That is a perfectly dressed salad.

If you are serving a large tossed salad that you are dressing and then passing, drizzle about an ounce of dressing per diner over the salad and then toss thoroughly, either with clean (or gloved) hands or with salad tongs. Pass extra at the table to satisfy anyone who likes a bit more dressing.

If you are serving individual salads, it is best to defer to your guests and leave the salads undressed and pass the dressing at the table. In that case, make sure that you have at least 2 ounces of dressing per diner to accommodate those of your guests who like to go a little heavy on the dressing.

How Much Sauce Should You Put On Protein (Meat/Poultry/Fish)

The rule of thumb for saucing proteins is one to two ounces, depending upon who you ask or what book you read. Of course, that doesn’t take into account what type of sauce is being served. The more flavorful and/or concentrated your sauce, the less you need.

If you are serving a reduction sauce, you may only need one ounce per serving. If you are serving a lightly-flavored sauce with fish or poultry, you will probably want to serve 2 ounces per serving.

On the other hand, if you are saucing with a compound butter, you might only need half an ounce. In all of these cases, though, it is advisable to have extra for passing at the table.

Appearances Make a Difference

At restaurants, plating the main protein can be a pretty elaborate affair involving squirt bottles, paint brushes and or spoons for precise saucing. The home cook can certainly find and use these items for plating, but generally there are three saucing options available to us without having to go to the restaurant supply or craft store.

  • Dipping the meat in/brushing the sauce on. Think barbecued ribs or chicken. In this case, the sauce is thick enough to coat the meat, so to serve all the cook has to do is dip the meat in the sauce and place it on the plate.
  • Pouring sauce over the meat. This one is easy: just put the meat on the plate and then ladle or pour the sauce on top.
  • Saucing the plate. This is probably the type of plating most closely associated with restaurants. Pour a pool of sauce in the center of the plate and then place the protein on top.

Of the three options, the second option is the only one that you might not have to pass extra sauce at the table. And all the rules can change if you are serving a meal with several side dishes, some of which people like to sauce.

Consider the Thanksgiving meal. I don’t know anyone who only sauces their meat. Gravy goes on everything from mashed potatoes to stuffing to green beans.

So, keep in mind the side dishes you are serving. If you’re serving a mushroom gravy with beef and some type of potato as a side dish, it’s almost guaranteed that everyone is going to want gravy on the potatoes, as well.

In the case of side dishes that beg for gravy, try to shoot for 2 ounces of gravy per diner per dish. So, if you are serving 6 diners and there are two dishes that need to be sauced, you’ll want to have at least 4 ounces of sauce per diner, or 24 ounces.

Again, everyone’s taste is different, and the amount of sauce you choose to make/serve along with a dish is a very subjective decision. Often, it might come down to how much sauce the recipe makes.

If there is any left over, you can serve extra. If there isn’t, then you can’t. And, at the end of the day, if you’re serving good food to good friends and family, most people are not going to lose any sleep over an ounce or two of sauce.


Saucing Food – How Much Is Enough

At restaurants, where food cost is king, the difference between 1 ounce and 3 ounces of sauce on a dish translates to cash for the restaurant. No matter what type of restaurant, portion control is a key to quality, consistency and revenue.

At McDonald’s they have a special condiment “portioner” that deposits exactly the same amount of ketchup and/or mustard on each and every burger. At other restaurants, portions are controlled through weighing and applying sauces and dressings with calibrated ladles (1/2 oz, 1 oz, 2 oz, etc).

The point is that, when you go to a restaurant, the amount of sauce and/or dressing that comes with your meal, be it osso bucco, spaghetti with marinara, or a mixed green salad, is accounted for down to the ounce.

The goal, of course, is to give each customer the “perfect amount” of sauce or dressing while keeping a tight handle on cost. This means that you, as the consumer, have very little control over the amount of sauce that arrives with your food.

This is not generally a bad thing, as most chefs will try to serve what they think is a reasonable amount of sauce, and that quantity appeals to the vast majority of diners. The trouble comes in if you are a person who either likes their salad, for instance, either swimming in dressing or dry.

Most restaurants can accommodate your requests by giving you dressing on the side or sending the plate out with double dressing. Don’t be surprised if you are charged extra for that dressing. Remember, food cost is king, and dressings are not free.

Fortunately, the goal of this book is to teach you how to make restaurant quality sauces at home. And when you cook at home, you of course have much more control over the amount of sauce that you serve with each dish.

Keeping in mind that it is easier to under-sauce and pass more at the table than it is to over-sauce and leave your guests wringing out their lettuce, there are some guidelines that are helpful when it comes to deciding how much sauce, gravy or salad dressing you are going to make to serve with your meal.

Many prestigious culinary schools, including the Culinary Institute of America, recommend a sauce serving of 2 ounces. This amount supposes a standard portion size for whatever is being sauced, too. Most of the recipes in this book serve four diners and yield one cup of sauce (2 ounces per diner) as per the CIA guidelines.

When considering whether or not to make additional sauce, think about what other dishes you’ll be serving and whether people might want to sauce those dishes as well. It is important to remember that, at the end of the day, you can provide as much or as little sauce as you deem appropriate for whatever dish you are serving.

That’s a pretty vague rule of thumb, so let’s take a look at the different types of foods that might require sauce and try to pin down some rules for each type.

How Much Sauce Should You Put On Pasta

In Italy, pasta is sauced with restraint, and the sauce serves to enhance and complement the flavor and texture of the pasta. In the United States, we are much more likely to use more sauce than the Italians.

It’s not that Americans waste sauce after all, that’s what garlic bread is for.

If you are going to serve pasta as a main course and also provide bread for “sopping,” a good rule of thumb is equal amounts of pasta and sauce. Four ounces of pasta, four ounces (roughly half a cup) of sauce.

If you are serving pasta and you just want the sauce to coat each piece without pooling on the plate, shoot for 2-3 ounces of sauce per 4 ounce serving of pasta.

How Much Sauce Should You Put On Salad

Contrary to what some children might think, salad dressing is not there to cover up the taste of the vegetables in a salad. A well-dressed salad maintains a nice balance between greens, vegetables and dressing.

The classic rule for dressing a salad is that each piece of lettuce be lightly coated with the dressing with none pooling on the plate.

Think of that all-you-can-eat soup/salad/breadstick meal at a popular chain Italian restaurant. Everyone seems to love their salads, and there is never any dressing pooled in the bottom of the serving bowl. That is a perfectly dressed salad.

If you are serving a large tossed salad that you are dressing and then passing, drizzle about an ounce of dressing per diner over the salad and then toss thoroughly, either with clean (or gloved) hands or with salad tongs. Pass extra at the table to satisfy anyone who likes a bit more dressing.

If you are serving individual salads, it is best to defer to your guests and leave the salads undressed and pass the dressing at the table. In that case, make sure that you have at least 2 ounces of dressing per diner to accommodate those of your guests who like to go a little heavy on the dressing.

How Much Sauce Should You Put On Protein (Meat/Poultry/Fish)

The rule of thumb for saucing proteins is one to two ounces, depending upon who you ask or what book you read. Of course, that doesn’t take into account what type of sauce is being served. The more flavorful and/or concentrated your sauce, the less you need.

If you are serving a reduction sauce, you may only need one ounce per serving. If you are serving a lightly-flavored sauce with fish or poultry, you will probably want to serve 2 ounces per serving.

On the other hand, if you are saucing with a compound butter, you might only need half an ounce. In all of these cases, though, it is advisable to have extra for passing at the table.

Appearances Make a Difference

At restaurants, plating the main protein can be a pretty elaborate affair involving squirt bottles, paint brushes and or spoons for precise saucing. The home cook can certainly find and use these items for plating, but generally there are three saucing options available to us without having to go to the restaurant supply or craft store.

  • Dipping the meat in/brushing the sauce on. Think barbecued ribs or chicken. In this case, the sauce is thick enough to coat the meat, so to serve all the cook has to do is dip the meat in the sauce and place it on the plate.
  • Pouring sauce over the meat. This one is easy: just put the meat on the plate and then ladle or pour the sauce on top.
  • Saucing the plate. This is probably the type of plating most closely associated with restaurants. Pour a pool of sauce in the center of the plate and then place the protein on top.

Of the three options, the second option is the only one that you might not have to pass extra sauce at the table. And all the rules can change if you are serving a meal with several side dishes, some of which people like to sauce.

Consider the Thanksgiving meal. I don’t know anyone who only sauces their meat. Gravy goes on everything from mashed potatoes to stuffing to green beans.

So, keep in mind the side dishes you are serving. If you’re serving a mushroom gravy with beef and some type of potato as a side dish, it’s almost guaranteed that everyone is going to want gravy on the potatoes, as well.

In the case of side dishes that beg for gravy, try to shoot for 2 ounces of gravy per diner per dish. So, if you are serving 6 diners and there are two dishes that need to be sauced, you’ll want to have at least 4 ounces of sauce per diner, or 24 ounces.

Again, everyone’s taste is different, and the amount of sauce you choose to make/serve along with a dish is a very subjective decision. Often, it might come down to how much sauce the recipe makes.

If there is any left over, you can serve extra. If there isn’t, then you can’t. And, at the end of the day, if you’re serving good food to good friends and family, most people are not going to lose any sleep over an ounce or two of sauce.


Saucing Food – How Much Is Enough

At restaurants, where food cost is king, the difference between 1 ounce and 3 ounces of sauce on a dish translates to cash for the restaurant. No matter what type of restaurant, portion control is a key to quality, consistency and revenue.

At McDonald’s they have a special condiment “portioner” that deposits exactly the same amount of ketchup and/or mustard on each and every burger. At other restaurants, portions are controlled through weighing and applying sauces and dressings with calibrated ladles (1/2 oz, 1 oz, 2 oz, etc).

The point is that, when you go to a restaurant, the amount of sauce and/or dressing that comes with your meal, be it osso bucco, spaghetti with marinara, or a mixed green salad, is accounted for down to the ounce.

The goal, of course, is to give each customer the “perfect amount” of sauce or dressing while keeping a tight handle on cost. This means that you, as the consumer, have very little control over the amount of sauce that arrives with your food.

This is not generally a bad thing, as most chefs will try to serve what they think is a reasonable amount of sauce, and that quantity appeals to the vast majority of diners. The trouble comes in if you are a person who either likes their salad, for instance, either swimming in dressing or dry.

Most restaurants can accommodate your requests by giving you dressing on the side or sending the plate out with double dressing. Don’t be surprised if you are charged extra for that dressing. Remember, food cost is king, and dressings are not free.

Fortunately, the goal of this book is to teach you how to make restaurant quality sauces at home. And when you cook at home, you of course have much more control over the amount of sauce that you serve with each dish.

Keeping in mind that it is easier to under-sauce and pass more at the table than it is to over-sauce and leave your guests wringing out their lettuce, there are some guidelines that are helpful when it comes to deciding how much sauce, gravy or salad dressing you are going to make to serve with your meal.

Many prestigious culinary schools, including the Culinary Institute of America, recommend a sauce serving of 2 ounces. This amount supposes a standard portion size for whatever is being sauced, too. Most of the recipes in this book serve four diners and yield one cup of sauce (2 ounces per diner) as per the CIA guidelines.

When considering whether or not to make additional sauce, think about what other dishes you’ll be serving and whether people might want to sauce those dishes as well. It is important to remember that, at the end of the day, you can provide as much or as little sauce as you deem appropriate for whatever dish you are serving.

That’s a pretty vague rule of thumb, so let’s take a look at the different types of foods that might require sauce and try to pin down some rules for each type.

How Much Sauce Should You Put On Pasta

In Italy, pasta is sauced with restraint, and the sauce serves to enhance and complement the flavor and texture of the pasta. In the United States, we are much more likely to use more sauce than the Italians.

It’s not that Americans waste sauce after all, that’s what garlic bread is for.

If you are going to serve pasta as a main course and also provide bread for “sopping,” a good rule of thumb is equal amounts of pasta and sauce. Four ounces of pasta, four ounces (roughly half a cup) of sauce.

If you are serving pasta and you just want the sauce to coat each piece without pooling on the plate, shoot for 2-3 ounces of sauce per 4 ounce serving of pasta.

How Much Sauce Should You Put On Salad

Contrary to what some children might think, salad dressing is not there to cover up the taste of the vegetables in a salad. A well-dressed salad maintains a nice balance between greens, vegetables and dressing.

The classic rule for dressing a salad is that each piece of lettuce be lightly coated with the dressing with none pooling on the plate.

Think of that all-you-can-eat soup/salad/breadstick meal at a popular chain Italian restaurant. Everyone seems to love their salads, and there is never any dressing pooled in the bottom of the serving bowl. That is a perfectly dressed salad.

If you are serving a large tossed salad that you are dressing and then passing, drizzle about an ounce of dressing per diner over the salad and then toss thoroughly, either with clean (or gloved) hands or with salad tongs. Pass extra at the table to satisfy anyone who likes a bit more dressing.

If you are serving individual salads, it is best to defer to your guests and leave the salads undressed and pass the dressing at the table. In that case, make sure that you have at least 2 ounces of dressing per diner to accommodate those of your guests who like to go a little heavy on the dressing.

How Much Sauce Should You Put On Protein (Meat/Poultry/Fish)

The rule of thumb for saucing proteins is one to two ounces, depending upon who you ask or what book you read. Of course, that doesn’t take into account what type of sauce is being served. The more flavorful and/or concentrated your sauce, the less you need.

If you are serving a reduction sauce, you may only need one ounce per serving. If you are serving a lightly-flavored sauce with fish or poultry, you will probably want to serve 2 ounces per serving.

On the other hand, if you are saucing with a compound butter, you might only need half an ounce. In all of these cases, though, it is advisable to have extra for passing at the table.

Appearances Make a Difference

At restaurants, plating the main protein can be a pretty elaborate affair involving squirt bottles, paint brushes and or spoons for precise saucing. The home cook can certainly find and use these items for plating, but generally there are three saucing options available to us without having to go to the restaurant supply or craft store.

  • Dipping the meat in/brushing the sauce on. Think barbecued ribs or chicken. In this case, the sauce is thick enough to coat the meat, so to serve all the cook has to do is dip the meat in the sauce and place it on the plate.
  • Pouring sauce over the meat. This one is easy: just put the meat on the plate and then ladle or pour the sauce on top.
  • Saucing the plate. This is probably the type of plating most closely associated with restaurants. Pour a pool of sauce in the center of the plate and then place the protein on top.

Of the three options, the second option is the only one that you might not have to pass extra sauce at the table. And all the rules can change if you are serving a meal with several side dishes, some of which people like to sauce.

Consider the Thanksgiving meal. I don’t know anyone who only sauces their meat. Gravy goes on everything from mashed potatoes to stuffing to green beans.

So, keep in mind the side dishes you are serving. If you’re serving a mushroom gravy with beef and some type of potato as a side dish, it’s almost guaranteed that everyone is going to want gravy on the potatoes, as well.

In the case of side dishes that beg for gravy, try to shoot for 2 ounces of gravy per diner per dish. So, if you are serving 6 diners and there are two dishes that need to be sauced, you’ll want to have at least 4 ounces of sauce per diner, or 24 ounces.

Again, everyone’s taste is different, and the amount of sauce you choose to make/serve along with a dish is a very subjective decision. Often, it might come down to how much sauce the recipe makes.

If there is any left over, you can serve extra. If there isn’t, then you can’t. And, at the end of the day, if you’re serving good food to good friends and family, most people are not going to lose any sleep over an ounce or two of sauce.


Saucing Food – How Much Is Enough

At restaurants, where food cost is king, the difference between 1 ounce and 3 ounces of sauce on a dish translates to cash for the restaurant. No matter what type of restaurant, portion control is a key to quality, consistency and revenue.

At McDonald’s they have a special condiment “portioner” that deposits exactly the same amount of ketchup and/or mustard on each and every burger. At other restaurants, portions are controlled through weighing and applying sauces and dressings with calibrated ladles (1/2 oz, 1 oz, 2 oz, etc).

The point is that, when you go to a restaurant, the amount of sauce and/or dressing that comes with your meal, be it osso bucco, spaghetti with marinara, or a mixed green salad, is accounted for down to the ounce.

The goal, of course, is to give each customer the “perfect amount” of sauce or dressing while keeping a tight handle on cost. This means that you, as the consumer, have very little control over the amount of sauce that arrives with your food.

This is not generally a bad thing, as most chefs will try to serve what they think is a reasonable amount of sauce, and that quantity appeals to the vast majority of diners. The trouble comes in if you are a person who either likes their salad, for instance, either swimming in dressing or dry.

Most restaurants can accommodate your requests by giving you dressing on the side or sending the plate out with double dressing. Don’t be surprised if you are charged extra for that dressing. Remember, food cost is king, and dressings are not free.

Fortunately, the goal of this book is to teach you how to make restaurant quality sauces at home. And when you cook at home, you of course have much more control over the amount of sauce that you serve with each dish.

Keeping in mind that it is easier to under-sauce and pass more at the table than it is to over-sauce and leave your guests wringing out their lettuce, there are some guidelines that are helpful when it comes to deciding how much sauce, gravy or salad dressing you are going to make to serve with your meal.

Many prestigious culinary schools, including the Culinary Institute of America, recommend a sauce serving of 2 ounces. This amount supposes a standard portion size for whatever is being sauced, too. Most of the recipes in this book serve four diners and yield one cup of sauce (2 ounces per diner) as per the CIA guidelines.

When considering whether or not to make additional sauce, think about what other dishes you’ll be serving and whether people might want to sauce those dishes as well. It is important to remember that, at the end of the day, you can provide as much or as little sauce as you deem appropriate for whatever dish you are serving.

That’s a pretty vague rule of thumb, so let’s take a look at the different types of foods that might require sauce and try to pin down some rules for each type.

How Much Sauce Should You Put On Pasta

In Italy, pasta is sauced with restraint, and the sauce serves to enhance and complement the flavor and texture of the pasta. In the United States, we are much more likely to use more sauce than the Italians.

It’s not that Americans waste sauce after all, that’s what garlic bread is for.

If you are going to serve pasta as a main course and also provide bread for “sopping,” a good rule of thumb is equal amounts of pasta and sauce. Four ounces of pasta, four ounces (roughly half a cup) of sauce.

If you are serving pasta and you just want the sauce to coat each piece without pooling on the plate, shoot for 2-3 ounces of sauce per 4 ounce serving of pasta.

How Much Sauce Should You Put On Salad

Contrary to what some children might think, salad dressing is not there to cover up the taste of the vegetables in a salad. A well-dressed salad maintains a nice balance between greens, vegetables and dressing.

The classic rule for dressing a salad is that each piece of lettuce be lightly coated with the dressing with none pooling on the plate.

Think of that all-you-can-eat soup/salad/breadstick meal at a popular chain Italian restaurant. Everyone seems to love their salads, and there is never any dressing pooled in the bottom of the serving bowl. That is a perfectly dressed salad.

If you are serving a large tossed salad that you are dressing and then passing, drizzle about an ounce of dressing per diner over the salad and then toss thoroughly, either with clean (or gloved) hands or with salad tongs. Pass extra at the table to satisfy anyone who likes a bit more dressing.

If you are serving individual salads, it is best to defer to your guests and leave the salads undressed and pass the dressing at the table. In that case, make sure that you have at least 2 ounces of dressing per diner to accommodate those of your guests who like to go a little heavy on the dressing.

How Much Sauce Should You Put On Protein (Meat/Poultry/Fish)

The rule of thumb for saucing proteins is one to two ounces, depending upon who you ask or what book you read. Of course, that doesn’t take into account what type of sauce is being served. The more flavorful and/or concentrated your sauce, the less you need.

If you are serving a reduction sauce, you may only need one ounce per serving. If you are serving a lightly-flavored sauce with fish or poultry, you will probably want to serve 2 ounces per serving.

On the other hand, if you are saucing with a compound butter, you might only need half an ounce. In all of these cases, though, it is advisable to have extra for passing at the table.

Appearances Make a Difference

At restaurants, plating the main protein can be a pretty elaborate affair involving squirt bottles, paint brushes and or spoons for precise saucing. The home cook can certainly find and use these items for plating, but generally there are three saucing options available to us without having to go to the restaurant supply or craft store.

  • Dipping the meat in/brushing the sauce on. Think barbecued ribs or chicken. In this case, the sauce is thick enough to coat the meat, so to serve all the cook has to do is dip the meat in the sauce and place it on the plate.
  • Pouring sauce over the meat. This one is easy: just put the meat on the plate and then ladle or pour the sauce on top.
  • Saucing the plate. This is probably the type of plating most closely associated with restaurants. Pour a pool of sauce in the center of the plate and then place the protein on top.

Of the three options, the second option is the only one that you might not have to pass extra sauce at the table. And all the rules can change if you are serving a meal with several side dishes, some of which people like to sauce.

Consider the Thanksgiving meal. I don’t know anyone who only sauces their meat. Gravy goes on everything from mashed potatoes to stuffing to green beans.

So, keep in mind the side dishes you are serving. If you’re serving a mushroom gravy with beef and some type of potato as a side dish, it’s almost guaranteed that everyone is going to want gravy on the potatoes, as well.

In the case of side dishes that beg for gravy, try to shoot for 2 ounces of gravy per diner per dish. So, if you are serving 6 diners and there are two dishes that need to be sauced, you’ll want to have at least 4 ounces of sauce per diner, or 24 ounces.

Again, everyone’s taste is different, and the amount of sauce you choose to make/serve along with a dish is a very subjective decision. Often, it might come down to how much sauce the recipe makes.

If there is any left over, you can serve extra. If there isn’t, then you can’t. And, at the end of the day, if you’re serving good food to good friends and family, most people are not going to lose any sleep over an ounce or two of sauce.


Saucing Food – How Much Is Enough

At restaurants, where food cost is king, the difference between 1 ounce and 3 ounces of sauce on a dish translates to cash for the restaurant. No matter what type of restaurant, portion control is a key to quality, consistency and revenue.

At McDonald’s they have a special condiment “portioner” that deposits exactly the same amount of ketchup and/or mustard on each and every burger. At other restaurants, portions are controlled through weighing and applying sauces and dressings with calibrated ladles (1/2 oz, 1 oz, 2 oz, etc).

The point is that, when you go to a restaurant, the amount of sauce and/or dressing that comes with your meal, be it osso bucco, spaghetti with marinara, or a mixed green salad, is accounted for down to the ounce.

The goal, of course, is to give each customer the “perfect amount” of sauce or dressing while keeping a tight handle on cost. This means that you, as the consumer, have very little control over the amount of sauce that arrives with your food.

This is not generally a bad thing, as most chefs will try to serve what they think is a reasonable amount of sauce, and that quantity appeals to the vast majority of diners. The trouble comes in if you are a person who either likes their salad, for instance, either swimming in dressing or dry.

Most restaurants can accommodate your requests by giving you dressing on the side or sending the plate out with double dressing. Don’t be surprised if you are charged extra for that dressing. Remember, food cost is king, and dressings are not free.

Fortunately, the goal of this book is to teach you how to make restaurant quality sauces at home. And when you cook at home, you of course have much more control over the amount of sauce that you serve with each dish.

Keeping in mind that it is easier to under-sauce and pass more at the table than it is to over-sauce and leave your guests wringing out their lettuce, there are some guidelines that are helpful when it comes to deciding how much sauce, gravy or salad dressing you are going to make to serve with your meal.

Many prestigious culinary schools, including the Culinary Institute of America, recommend a sauce serving of 2 ounces. This amount supposes a standard portion size for whatever is being sauced, too. Most of the recipes in this book serve four diners and yield one cup of sauce (2 ounces per diner) as per the CIA guidelines.

When considering whether or not to make additional sauce, think about what other dishes you’ll be serving and whether people might want to sauce those dishes as well. It is important to remember that, at the end of the day, you can provide as much or as little sauce as you deem appropriate for whatever dish you are serving.

That’s a pretty vague rule of thumb, so let’s take a look at the different types of foods that might require sauce and try to pin down some rules for each type.

How Much Sauce Should You Put On Pasta

In Italy, pasta is sauced with restraint, and the sauce serves to enhance and complement the flavor and texture of the pasta. In the United States, we are much more likely to use more sauce than the Italians.

It’s not that Americans waste sauce after all, that’s what garlic bread is for.

If you are going to serve pasta as a main course and also provide bread for “sopping,” a good rule of thumb is equal amounts of pasta and sauce. Four ounces of pasta, four ounces (roughly half a cup) of sauce.

If you are serving pasta and you just want the sauce to coat each piece without pooling on the plate, shoot for 2-3 ounces of sauce per 4 ounce serving of pasta.

How Much Sauce Should You Put On Salad

Contrary to what some children might think, salad dressing is not there to cover up the taste of the vegetables in a salad. A well-dressed salad maintains a nice balance between greens, vegetables and dressing.

The classic rule for dressing a salad is that each piece of lettuce be lightly coated with the dressing with none pooling on the plate.

Think of that all-you-can-eat soup/salad/breadstick meal at a popular chain Italian restaurant. Everyone seems to love their salads, and there is never any dressing pooled in the bottom of the serving bowl. That is a perfectly dressed salad.

If you are serving a large tossed salad that you are dressing and then passing, drizzle about an ounce of dressing per diner over the salad and then toss thoroughly, either with clean (or gloved) hands or with salad tongs. Pass extra at the table to satisfy anyone who likes a bit more dressing.

If you are serving individual salads, it is best to defer to your guests and leave the salads undressed and pass the dressing at the table. In that case, make sure that you have at least 2 ounces of dressing per diner to accommodate those of your guests who like to go a little heavy on the dressing.

How Much Sauce Should You Put On Protein (Meat/Poultry/Fish)

The rule of thumb for saucing proteins is one to two ounces, depending upon who you ask or what book you read. Of course, that doesn’t take into account what type of sauce is being served. The more flavorful and/or concentrated your sauce, the less you need.

If you are serving a reduction sauce, you may only need one ounce per serving. If you are serving a lightly-flavored sauce with fish or poultry, you will probably want to serve 2 ounces per serving.

On the other hand, if you are saucing with a compound butter, you might only need half an ounce. In all of these cases, though, it is advisable to have extra for passing at the table.

Appearances Make a Difference

At restaurants, plating the main protein can be a pretty elaborate affair involving squirt bottles, paint brushes and or spoons for precise saucing. The home cook can certainly find and use these items for plating, but generally there are three saucing options available to us without having to go to the restaurant supply or craft store.

  • Dipping the meat in/brushing the sauce on. Think barbecued ribs or chicken. In this case, the sauce is thick enough to coat the meat, so to serve all the cook has to do is dip the meat in the sauce and place it on the plate.
  • Pouring sauce over the meat. This one is easy: just put the meat on the plate and then ladle or pour the sauce on top.
  • Saucing the plate. This is probably the type of plating most closely associated with restaurants. Pour a pool of sauce in the center of the plate and then place the protein on top.

Of the three options, the second option is the only one that you might not have to pass extra sauce at the table. And all the rules can change if you are serving a meal with several side dishes, some of which people like to sauce.

Consider the Thanksgiving meal. I don’t know anyone who only sauces their meat. Gravy goes on everything from mashed potatoes to stuffing to green beans.

So, keep in mind the side dishes you are serving. If you’re serving a mushroom gravy with beef and some type of potato as a side dish, it’s almost guaranteed that everyone is going to want gravy on the potatoes, as well.

In the case of side dishes that beg for gravy, try to shoot for 2 ounces of gravy per diner per dish. So, if you are serving 6 diners and there are two dishes that need to be sauced, you’ll want to have at least 4 ounces of sauce per diner, or 24 ounces.

Again, everyone’s taste is different, and the amount of sauce you choose to make/serve along with a dish is a very subjective decision. Often, it might come down to how much sauce the recipe makes.

If there is any left over, you can serve extra. If there isn’t, then you can’t. And, at the end of the day, if you’re serving good food to good friends and family, most people are not going to lose any sleep over an ounce or two of sauce.


Saucing Food – How Much Is Enough

At restaurants, where food cost is king, the difference between 1 ounce and 3 ounces of sauce on a dish translates to cash for the restaurant. No matter what type of restaurant, portion control is a key to quality, consistency and revenue.

At McDonald’s they have a special condiment “portioner” that deposits exactly the same amount of ketchup and/or mustard on each and every burger. At other restaurants, portions are controlled through weighing and applying sauces and dressings with calibrated ladles (1/2 oz, 1 oz, 2 oz, etc).

The point is that, when you go to a restaurant, the amount of sauce and/or dressing that comes with your meal, be it osso bucco, spaghetti with marinara, or a mixed green salad, is accounted for down to the ounce.

The goal, of course, is to give each customer the “perfect amount” of sauce or dressing while keeping a tight handle on cost. This means that you, as the consumer, have very little control over the amount of sauce that arrives with your food.

This is not generally a bad thing, as most chefs will try to serve what they think is a reasonable amount of sauce, and that quantity appeals to the vast majority of diners. The trouble comes in if you are a person who either likes their salad, for instance, either swimming in dressing or dry.

Most restaurants can accommodate your requests by giving you dressing on the side or sending the plate out with double dressing. Don’t be surprised if you are charged extra for that dressing. Remember, food cost is king, and dressings are not free.

Fortunately, the goal of this book is to teach you how to make restaurant quality sauces at home. And when you cook at home, you of course have much more control over the amount of sauce that you serve with each dish.

Keeping in mind that it is easier to under-sauce and pass more at the table than it is to over-sauce and leave your guests wringing out their lettuce, there are some guidelines that are helpful when it comes to deciding how much sauce, gravy or salad dressing you are going to make to serve with your meal.

Many prestigious culinary schools, including the Culinary Institute of America, recommend a sauce serving of 2 ounces. This amount supposes a standard portion size for whatever is being sauced, too. Most of the recipes in this book serve four diners and yield one cup of sauce (2 ounces per diner) as per the CIA guidelines.

When considering whether or not to make additional sauce, think about what other dishes you’ll be serving and whether people might want to sauce those dishes as well. It is important to remember that, at the end of the day, you can provide as much or as little sauce as you deem appropriate for whatever dish you are serving.

That’s a pretty vague rule of thumb, so let’s take a look at the different types of foods that might require sauce and try to pin down some rules for each type.

How Much Sauce Should You Put On Pasta

In Italy, pasta is sauced with restraint, and the sauce serves to enhance and complement the flavor and texture of the pasta. In the United States, we are much more likely to use more sauce than the Italians.

It’s not that Americans waste sauce after all, that’s what garlic bread is for.

If you are going to serve pasta as a main course and also provide bread for “sopping,” a good rule of thumb is equal amounts of pasta and sauce. Four ounces of pasta, four ounces (roughly half a cup) of sauce.

If you are serving pasta and you just want the sauce to coat each piece without pooling on the plate, shoot for 2-3 ounces of sauce per 4 ounce serving of pasta.

How Much Sauce Should You Put On Salad

Contrary to what some children might think, salad dressing is not there to cover up the taste of the vegetables in a salad. A well-dressed salad maintains a nice balance between greens, vegetables and dressing.

The classic rule for dressing a salad is that each piece of lettuce be lightly coated with the dressing with none pooling on the plate.

Think of that all-you-can-eat soup/salad/breadstick meal at a popular chain Italian restaurant. Everyone seems to love their salads, and there is never any dressing pooled in the bottom of the serving bowl. That is a perfectly dressed salad.

If you are serving a large tossed salad that you are dressing and then passing, drizzle about an ounce of dressing per diner over the salad and then toss thoroughly, either with clean (or gloved) hands or with salad tongs. Pass extra at the table to satisfy anyone who likes a bit more dressing.

If you are serving individual salads, it is best to defer to your guests and leave the salads undressed and pass the dressing at the table. In that case, make sure that you have at least 2 ounces of dressing per diner to accommodate those of your guests who like to go a little heavy on the dressing.

How Much Sauce Should You Put On Protein (Meat/Poultry/Fish)

The rule of thumb for saucing proteins is one to two ounces, depending upon who you ask or what book you read. Of course, that doesn’t take into account what type of sauce is being served. The more flavorful and/or concentrated your sauce, the less you need.

If you are serving a reduction sauce, you may only need one ounce per serving. If you are serving a lightly-flavored sauce with fish or poultry, you will probably want to serve 2 ounces per serving.

On the other hand, if you are saucing with a compound butter, you might only need half an ounce. In all of these cases, though, it is advisable to have extra for passing at the table.

Appearances Make a Difference

At restaurants, plating the main protein can be a pretty elaborate affair involving squirt bottles, paint brushes and or spoons for precise saucing. The home cook can certainly find and use these items for plating, but generally there are three saucing options available to us without having to go to the restaurant supply or craft store.

  • Dipping the meat in/brushing the sauce on. Think barbecued ribs or chicken. In this case, the sauce is thick enough to coat the meat, so to serve all the cook has to do is dip the meat in the sauce and place it on the plate.
  • Pouring sauce over the meat. This one is easy: just put the meat on the plate and then ladle or pour the sauce on top.
  • Saucing the plate. This is probably the type of plating most closely associated with restaurants. Pour a pool of sauce in the center of the plate and then place the protein on top.

Of the three options, the second option is the only one that you might not have to pass extra sauce at the table. And all the rules can change if you are serving a meal with several side dishes, some of which people like to sauce.

Consider the Thanksgiving meal. I don’t know anyone who only sauces their meat. Gravy goes on everything from mashed potatoes to stuffing to green beans.

So, keep in mind the side dishes you are serving. If you’re serving a mushroom gravy with beef and some type of potato as a side dish, it’s almost guaranteed that everyone is going to want gravy on the potatoes, as well.

In the case of side dishes that beg for gravy, try to shoot for 2 ounces of gravy per diner per dish. So, if you are serving 6 diners and there are two dishes that need to be sauced, you’ll want to have at least 4 ounces of sauce per diner, or 24 ounces.

Again, everyone’s taste is different, and the amount of sauce you choose to make/serve along with a dish is a very subjective decision. Often, it might come down to how much sauce the recipe makes.

If there is any left over, you can serve extra. If there isn’t, then you can’t. And, at the end of the day, if you’re serving good food to good friends and family, most people are not going to lose any sleep over an ounce or two of sauce.


Saucing Food – How Much Is Enough

At restaurants, where food cost is king, the difference between 1 ounce and 3 ounces of sauce on a dish translates to cash for the restaurant. No matter what type of restaurant, portion control is a key to quality, consistency and revenue.

At McDonald’s they have a special condiment “portioner” that deposits exactly the same amount of ketchup and/or mustard on each and every burger. At other restaurants, portions are controlled through weighing and applying sauces and dressings with calibrated ladles (1/2 oz, 1 oz, 2 oz, etc).

The point is that, when you go to a restaurant, the amount of sauce and/or dressing that comes with your meal, be it osso bucco, spaghetti with marinara, or a mixed green salad, is accounted for down to the ounce.

The goal, of course, is to give each customer the “perfect amount” of sauce or dressing while keeping a tight handle on cost. This means that you, as the consumer, have very little control over the amount of sauce that arrives with your food.

This is not generally a bad thing, as most chefs will try to serve what they think is a reasonable amount of sauce, and that quantity appeals to the vast majority of diners. The trouble comes in if you are a person who either likes their salad, for instance, either swimming in dressing or dry.

Most restaurants can accommodate your requests by giving you dressing on the side or sending the plate out with double dressing. Don’t be surprised if you are charged extra for that dressing. Remember, food cost is king, and dressings are not free.

Fortunately, the goal of this book is to teach you how to make restaurant quality sauces at home. And when you cook at home, you of course have much more control over the amount of sauce that you serve with each dish.

Keeping in mind that it is easier to under-sauce and pass more at the table than it is to over-sauce and leave your guests wringing out their lettuce, there are some guidelines that are helpful when it comes to deciding how much sauce, gravy or salad dressing you are going to make to serve with your meal.

Many prestigious culinary schools, including the Culinary Institute of America, recommend a sauce serving of 2 ounces. This amount supposes a standard portion size for whatever is being sauced, too. Most of the recipes in this book serve four diners and yield one cup of sauce (2 ounces per diner) as per the CIA guidelines.

When considering whether or not to make additional sauce, think about what other dishes you’ll be serving and whether people might want to sauce those dishes as well. It is important to remember that, at the end of the day, you can provide as much or as little sauce as you deem appropriate for whatever dish you are serving.

That’s a pretty vague rule of thumb, so let’s take a look at the different types of foods that might require sauce and try to pin down some rules for each type.

How Much Sauce Should You Put On Pasta

In Italy, pasta is sauced with restraint, and the sauce serves to enhance and complement the flavor and texture of the pasta. In the United States, we are much more likely to use more sauce than the Italians.

It’s not that Americans waste sauce after all, that’s what garlic bread is for.

If you are going to serve pasta as a main course and also provide bread for “sopping,” a good rule of thumb is equal amounts of pasta and sauce. Four ounces of pasta, four ounces (roughly half a cup) of sauce.

If you are serving pasta and you just want the sauce to coat each piece without pooling on the plate, shoot for 2-3 ounces of sauce per 4 ounce serving of pasta.

How Much Sauce Should You Put On Salad

Contrary to what some children might think, salad dressing is not there to cover up the taste of the vegetables in a salad. A well-dressed salad maintains a nice balance between greens, vegetables and dressing.

The classic rule for dressing a salad is that each piece of lettuce be lightly coated with the dressing with none pooling on the plate.

Think of that all-you-can-eat soup/salad/breadstick meal at a popular chain Italian restaurant. Everyone seems to love their salads, and there is never any dressing pooled in the bottom of the serving bowl. That is a perfectly dressed salad.

If you are serving a large tossed salad that you are dressing and then passing, drizzle about an ounce of dressing per diner over the salad and then toss thoroughly, either with clean (or gloved) hands or with salad tongs. Pass extra at the table to satisfy anyone who likes a bit more dressing.

If you are serving individual salads, it is best to defer to your guests and leave the salads undressed and pass the dressing at the table. In that case, make sure that you have at least 2 ounces of dressing per diner to accommodate those of your guests who like to go a little heavy on the dressing.

How Much Sauce Should You Put On Protein (Meat/Poultry/Fish)

The rule of thumb for saucing proteins is one to two ounces, depending upon who you ask or what book you read. Of course, that doesn’t take into account what type of sauce is being served. The more flavorful and/or concentrated your sauce, the less you need.

If you are serving a reduction sauce, you may only need one ounce per serving. If you are serving a lightly-flavored sauce with fish or poultry, you will probably want to serve 2 ounces per serving.

On the other hand, if you are saucing with a compound butter, you might only need half an ounce. In all of these cases, though, it is advisable to have extra for passing at the table.

Appearances Make a Difference

At restaurants, plating the main protein can be a pretty elaborate affair involving squirt bottles, paint brushes and or spoons for precise saucing. The home cook can certainly find and use these items for plating, but generally there are three saucing options available to us without having to go to the restaurant supply or craft store.

  • Dipping the meat in/brushing the sauce on. Think barbecued ribs or chicken. In this case, the sauce is thick enough to coat the meat, so to serve all the cook has to do is dip the meat in the sauce and place it on the plate.
  • Pouring sauce over the meat. This one is easy: just put the meat on the plate and then ladle or pour the sauce on top.
  • Saucing the plate. This is probably the type of plating most closely associated with restaurants. Pour a pool of sauce in the center of the plate and then place the protein on top.

Of the three options, the second option is the only one that you might not have to pass extra sauce at the table. And all the rules can change if you are serving a meal with several side dishes, some of which people like to sauce.

Consider the Thanksgiving meal. I don’t know anyone who only sauces their meat. Gravy goes on everything from mashed potatoes to stuffing to green beans.

So, keep in mind the side dishes you are serving. If you’re serving a mushroom gravy with beef and some type of potato as a side dish, it’s almost guaranteed that everyone is going to want gravy on the potatoes, as well.

In the case of side dishes that beg for gravy, try to shoot for 2 ounces of gravy per diner per dish. So, if you are serving 6 diners and there are two dishes that need to be sauced, you’ll want to have at least 4 ounces of sauce per diner, or 24 ounces.

Again, everyone’s taste is different, and the amount of sauce you choose to make/serve along with a dish is a very subjective decision. Often, it might come down to how much sauce the recipe makes.

If there is any left over, you can serve extra. If there isn’t, then you can’t. And, at the end of the day, if you’re serving good food to good friends and family, most people are not going to lose any sleep over an ounce or two of sauce.