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What to Eat in Amsterdam: Appeltaart

What to Eat in Amsterdam: Appeltaart


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Eat Your World spotlights regional foods and drinks around the globe, from New York to New Delhi. Visit their Netherlands section for more of the best Dutch dishes in Amsterdam.

What: Whoever coined the phrase "as American as apple pie" surely hadn’t been to the Netherlands. Dutch apple pie, appeltaart (or appelgebak), has been a quintessential sweet in the country’s cuisine for centuries, and countless cafés, restaurants, and bakeries in modern-day Amsterdam reflect this. A common accompaniment to koffie (coffee), and often served met slagroom (with whipped cream), appeltaart differs from American apple pie in a number of ways: It’s baked in a spring-form pan, making it instantly deeper; it’s much drier inside, not at all syrupy; it’s really chock-full of big, firm hunks of apple (and often raisins or currants); and it tends to rely on sugar, lemon juice, cinnamon, rum or brandy, and other warm spices for flavor. Find a good appeltaart in Amsterdam, and you’ll be hard-pressed to eat anything else for breakfast there, ever.

Where: It’s not really a secret that Café Winkel, in the hip Jordaan neighborhood, has one of the best appeltaarts in the city. Fortunately, it lives up to its reputation. Bonus: The café is on a busy corner near a popular Saturday and Monday market, affording some great people-watching.

When: Monday, 7 a.m. to 1 a.m.; Tuesday to Thursday, 8 a.m. to 1 a.m.; Friday 8 a.m. to 3 a.m.; Saturday 7 a.m. to 3 a.m.; Sunday, 10 a.m. to 1 a.m. Mornings on the outdoor terrace here are your best bet, though you may have to wait to score a table.

Order: Ask for appeltaart met slagroom (€3,50), which is typically served at room temperature, and prepare to have your mind blown a little. The thick-cut apples are moist, plentiful, and interspersed with plump raisins; the crust is deliciously crunchy; the slagroom brings just the right creaminess to the buttery pastry and tart apple sweetness. Enjoy with your choice of coffee — if you’re feeling indulgent, try a koffie verkeerd, the Dutch equivalent of café au lait.

Alternatively: The canalside Villa Zeezicht (+31 20 6267433; Torensteeg 7, map) likewise gets huge props for its appeltaart (and outdoor terrace). Failing that, find your own local café and give its appeltaart a try — how bad can it really be?

Laura Siciliano-Rosen is the co-founder of Eat Your World, a website that spotlights regional foods and drinks around the globe. Follow Eat Your World on Twitter @eat_your_world.


The Spruce / Karin Engelbrecht

It's hard to beat the tender texture and delicate flavor of white asparagus. But it's even harder to beat the way the Dutch enjoy it: swathed in Hollandaise sauce, chopped boiled eggs and slices of ham. This asparagus hollandaise is spring cuisine at its swoon-worthy best.


Amsterdam

What: Whoever coined the phrase &ldquoas American as apple pie&rdquo surely hadn&rsquot been to the Netherlands. Dutch apple pie, appeltaart (or appelgebak), has been a quintessential sweet in the country&rsquos cuisine for centuries, and countless cafes, restaurants, and bakeries in modern-day Amsterdam reflect this. A common accompaniment to koffie (coffee), and often served met slagroom (with whipped cream), appeltaart differs from American apple pie in a number of ways: It&rsquos baked in a spring-form pan, making it instantly deeper it&rsquos much drier inside, not at all syrupy it&rsquos really chock-full of big, firm hunks of apple (and often raisins or currants) and it tends to rely on sugar, lemon juice, cinnamon, rum or brandy, and other warm spices for flavor. Find a good appeltaart in Amsterdam, and you&rsquoll be hard-pressed to eat anything else for breakfast there, ever.

Where: It&rsquos not really a secret that Café Winkel (Noordermarkt 43), in the hip Jordaan neighborhood, has one of the best appeltaarts in the city. Fortunately, it lives up to its reputation. Bonus: The cafe is on a busy corner near a popular Saturday and Monday market, affording some great people-watching.

When: Mon, 7am-1am Tues-Thurs, 8am-1am Fri, 8am-3am Sat, 7am-3am Sun, 10am-1am. Mornings on the outdoor terrace here are your best bet, though you may have to wait to score a table.

WATCH: A one-minute trip through Amsterdam.

Order: Ask for appeltaart met slagroom (&euro3,50), which is typically served at room temperature, and prepare to have your mind blown a little. The thick-cut apples are moist, plentiful, and interspersed with plump raisins the crust is deliciously crunchy the slagroom brings just the right creaminess to the buttery pastry and tart apple sweetness. Enjoy with your choice of coffee&mdashif you&rsquore feeling indulgent, try a koffie verkeerd, the Dutch equivalent of café au lait.

Alternatively:The canalside Villa Zeezicht (020-626-7433 Torensteeg 7, map) likewise gets huge props for its appeltaart (and outdoor terrace). Failing that, find your own local café and give its appeltaart a try&mdashhow bad can it really be?


Bitterballen, Stamppot, and Appeltaart–oh my!

Some people think of rich desserts, bland meat and potato dishes, or perhaps pancakes, when they think of Dutch cuisine. But they’d be wrong. On our recent adventure in The Netherlands, we sampled a wealth of incredibly varied, fresh and delicious Dutch recipes–all available at great cafes, brewpubs and restaurants!

Here are our two favorite meals we enjoyed on our recent visit, and seven top dishes from The Netherlands with tested recipes for four:

Dutch Cheese Platter at De Molenwiek (or pretty much any restaurant in The Netherlands) – No visit to The Netherlands is complete without trying the flavorful and diverse selection of cheeses for which Hollanders are famous. This particular cheese platter, at De Molenwiek’s authentic Dutch kitchen, included oude kaas (aged gouda), jonge kaas (young gouda), and a creamy, soft, white rind cheese similar to brie, along with strong mustard, divine rolls (just the right amount of crust, pillow soft inside), and a small mixed salad.

Bitterballen – these enticing little fried meat-n-gravy balls are truly spectacular! We all felt we could eat our weight in them. They are traditionally served with other appetizers/beer snacks (kaasstengels, or fried cheese sticks, kaassouffleetjes, or fluffy cheese snacks, and vlammetjes, filled with pork), as bittergarnituur, or “garnish for bitters” (alcohol). We had bitterballen as part of a bittergarnituur at De Molenwiek, and then ordered bitterballen alone when we popped into cafes during our daily wanderings. Easy to make, and available in vegetarian version as well, this Dutch treat is comforting and filling in equal measure.

Craft Beer – Speaking of bittergarnituur, you must try the craft beverages at Cause Beer Loves Food, a gastropub in central Amsterdam! Serving up bitterballen and other tasty treats, you can also sample interesting craft brews from all over The Netherlands. Definitely a place to relax and refuel after a full day’s activities.

Stamppot – Looking a bit like a stew that is thicker than stew has a right to be, this is another Dutch comfort food we loved. We had a delicious bowl of it at Tante Roojte in Amsterdam. Stamppot is mashed potato mixed with various cooked veggies plus dutch sausage. Consider the recipe more a guide than a requirement, and make it yours – as healthy or traditional as you like. It’s a straightforward recipe and a filling taste treat!

Friet & fritessaus – Dotted across The Netherlands are what Americans would call French Fry stands. Traditionally, Dutch eat their friet (fries) with a leaner and sweeter-than-mayonnaise white sauce called fritessaus. Other popular fries-and-sauce combinations include friet joppiesaus (fries with a mixture of mayo, ketchup, and spices, friet speciaal (fries with mayo, curry or ketchup, and onions), and patatje oorlog (fries with peanut sauce, mayonnaise, and raw chopped onions). You can easily walkabout with your snack — the fries are served in a sturdy paper cone with the condiments on top (and with a tiny fork for lifting the delightfully smothered pieces of fried potato heaven).

Appeltaart – Just about every dining establishment in The Netherlands offers Appeltaart, or apple tart. Especially tasty with coffee, appeltaart lets the fruit speak to your taste buds, has a gloriously flaky crust, and is served with lashings of cream. The appeltaart and coffee service at American Hotel – Amsterdam’s cafe is an especially good example. If you’d like to make your own appeltaart, try this recipe.

Dutch Pancakes – Like appelttaart, Dutch pancakes can be found in nearly every cafe and restaurant. Somewhere between American pancakes and crepes in both diameter and thickness, pannenkoeken are served both sweet and savory. Our favorite is served with appelstroop (delish sticky and dense Dutch apple syrup). You may be able to find appelstroop at specialty or international markets near your home in the US. Or try this recipe at home.

Rijstaffel (Rice table) at Indrapura – Given the Dutch penchant for exploring and colonising countries around the world, including the East Indies, you’d expect food experiences with an Indonesian twist. This ‘Dutch-Indonesian tapas’ does not disappoint. Most rijstaffel spots will seat tables of 2 or more, but the warm and hospitable folks at Indrapura will seat singletons as well. Comprised of small dishes of starters, mains, and rices, a rijstaffel experience fills you with both food and companionship. The atmosphere encourages shared food and conversation – and this one included a talented pianist playing a variety of engaging pieces from Cole Porter to current pop standards, at a perfect decibel level. Indrapura offers desserts, but every time we go, we’re too stuffed with the starters and mains to contemplate a sweet ending. If you’d like to try a bit of rijstaffel at your home, make some Bami Goreng (with noodles or rice).

Want to try some delectable Dutch cuisine in The Netherlands? Contact Dragon In Your Pocket for travel consulting, booking, or guiding your next trip!


Helpful Tips for Making Dutch Apple Pie

  • Crust: Unlike a classic apple pie that uses shortcrust pastry that you need to roll out, Dutch apple pie has a press in crust that&rsquos as easy to make as a graham-cracker crust. You simply need to combine all of the crust ingredients together, let it rest for a short while, then press it in a springform pan.
  • Spices: Dutch apple pie uses a traditional Dutch spice mix called speculaaskruiden. In the Netherlands, this spice mix is sold in grocery stores (much as pumpkin pie spice), but you can easily mix your own. You could simply use a combination of cinnamon and ginger, but the mixed spices provide a more complex flavor.
  • Required Tools: The recipe recommends using a food processor, but you can also use a stand mixer or a hand mixer.
  • Timing: You need to make Dutch apple pie at least a half day before you plan on serving it. This is because the pie must cool thoroughly before being removed from the springform pan and sliced. The pie firms up as it cools, making it easier to cut neat pieces out of this deep-dish delight.
  • Serving: To serve, you can garnish each serving with whipped cream, as they do in Amsterdam, or with vanilla bean gelato or ice cream. It&rsquos also just delightful on its own, especially if you choose to have it for breakfast.

GET A PRINTABLE VERSION OF THE RECIPE: I&rsquoll first break down the recipe into detailed steps with helpful pictures, but you can also skip it and jump to a printable version of the recipe at the bottom of the post, if that&rsquos what you&rsquore looking for.


Now here is one you will find a lot more palatable than pickled fish! Poffertjes are little pancakes made out of buckwheat. They are light, fluffy, and typically served with powdered sugar and butter or sometimes a syrup.

You will also find pannenkoeken widely served.

They are quite similar to poffertjes with a few minor differences in preparation. Basically, you can think of poffertjes more like American pancakes while pannenkoeken are more like crêpes (though a little bit thicker). While poffertjes are pretty much always sweet, you will find savory and sweet variations of pannenkoeken.


#17 Dutch Cuisine For The Holidays

In the Netherlands, particular foods are only consumed during specific holidays. From November until the New Year, there are three distinct holidays to be celebrated: Sinterklaas, Kerst (Christmas In Dutch) and the New Year.

Kruidnoten (Ginger Nuts)

According to Dutch traditions, Sinterklaas, the man who brings presents to Dutch girls and boys, arrives in the Netherlands by boat in November. He then visits children and appears in parades around the country until the presents are delivered on St. Nicholas Day, which is December 6. Kruidnoten, which translates to Ginger Nuts, go hand-in-hand with the Sinterklaas celebrations. However, they aren’t actually nuts at all Kruidnoten are dollop-sized spiced typical Dutch cookies, often coated in chocolate (milk, dark and white). Kruidnoten is only available until St. Nicholas Day – after Sinterklaas delivers presents, these Dutch Christmas food treats are no longer available!

Gourmetten

We wanted to eat traditional Dutch Christmas food for our holiday meal – and when we asked, “What do Dutch people eat at Christmas” everyone told us: Gourmetten! The popular Netherlands Christmas food tradition is similar to that of a fondue dinner. Small portions of raw meat and vegetables are prepared in advance then a tiered skillet is placed in the center of the table and each diner has an individual tray they use to cook their own meal.

Oliebollen (Dutch Donuts)

Oliebollen makes an even shorter appearance than Kruidnoten – and are available between Christmas and New Year’s Eve. The dough is deep-fried and then coated in sugar – and, obviously, delicious. Need we say more?

Dutch Banketstaaf

Another popular Christmastime dessert is Banketstaaf, a Dutch almond paste-filled pastry. Also called the Dutch Christmas Log (because it is often made as a long roll that is cut into pieces), the pastry has a butter, flakey exterior and a sweet creamy filling. Some variations have powdered sugar sprinkled on top or sliced almonds…but anyway you eat it, it’s exquisite.

Bisschopswijn (Bishop’s Wine)

Bisschopswijn is the Dutch version of mulled wine the Dutch drinks are popular at Christmas markets to help stay warm while outside in the chilly air. The spicy concoction is fairly simple to recreate at home, as it comes with a pretty basic recipe (red wine, orange slices, cloves, cinnamon and a little sugar heated for 30 minutes and then served).

Pro Tip: While Bisschopswijn is a popular drink at Christmas, beer is the Dutch drink of choice year round! If you are in Amsterdam, be sure to check out the best Amsterdam Craft Beer Bars!

Are you in Amsterdam and craving delicious Dutch Cuisine? Join a tour guide on an incredible discovery of must-try Dutch food on a highly-rated food tour! Book in advance, only 12 participants per tour!


Sunday Recipe: Anna’s Dutch Appeltaart with Cardamom

I was destined to fall in love with the appeltaart.

When I travel I have a tendency to fall for local foods. It may be the most basic of foods in that location, but when you’re an outsider, it’s exotic. And so I identify a local dish that’s easy to find in a variety of places and I order it wherever I go. It could be called a weird travel quirk, but when you find a local food that you love and you stick with it.

And so it was with the appeltaart.

The famed appeltaart at Winkel

On our first afternoon in Amsterdam we were wandering the neighborhood in search of lunch and a double espresso. In the middle of summer, with the sun shining and every cafe known to man having an extensive outdoor seating area, this is not hard to do. So we randomly picked one that had a nice wooden table right next to the entrance and sat down.

Towards the end of our salads, I realized that everyone else was ordering huge pieces of apple pie covered in whipped cream. When every table around you is ordering the same thing, you know that you must do the same.

It wasn’t until later that I realized that we had serendipitously ended up at Winkel, the one cafe that an acquaintance had tipped me off to as having the “best apple pie in Amsterdam.” Some foodie affairs are just meant to happen.

What ensued was a week long obsession with appeltaart, and an even larger obsession with trying to make it myself once I returned home. Fortunately, there’s this thing called the internet. Thanks to Food Nouveau who carefully laid out not only the Winkel appeltaart, but also the one served at ‘t Smalle Cafe (another Amsterdam favorite), I now had a recipe to work with, and maybe I could kick this feeling of being sad about leaving Amsterdam. I even went out and bought a springform pan sometimes travel also reminds you of what your kitchen is lacking.

As with most recipes, I had to give it my own spin, so this appeltaart is heavy on the cardamom and completely gluten free. It took a bit of experimentation to get it right, my first crust being much too dry. But thanks to some tweaking and incorporation of almond meal (a go to gluten free flour when I am baking) the end result is a tart that’s a little softer than the Amsterdam classic, but still retains the right amount of sweet thanks to the combination of crisp apples and raisins. A traveler’s rendition of a classic dish.

This is not your American Apple Pie, so throw those expectations out the window right now, and keep in mind that it’s best served with fresh whipped cream and a double espresso, of course.

Anna’s Dutch Appeltaart with Cardamom

  • 1 1/4 cup sorghum flour
  • 1 1/4 cup rice flour
  • 2 1/4 cup almond meal
  • 2 1/2 teaspoons xantham gum
  • 2 1/2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 3/4 cup sugar
  • 2 large eggs
  • 1 teaspoon cardamom
  • 375 grams butter (about 1 1/2 cups, or 3 sticks)

Note: this recipe is meant for a 9-inch springform pan, resulting in a very big appeltart. If you’re using a smaller pan, you may want to cut the recipe in half, or just bake two.

  • 8 apples (use a harder/crispier variety)
  • 1/2 cup brown sugar
  • 1/2 cup raisins
  • juice + zest of 1/2 lemon
  • 1 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 1 teaspoon cardamom
  • 1 teaspoon nutmeg
  • 2 teaspoons cornstarch

Start by preparing the crust dough. Cream butter and sugar and set aside. In a separate bowl, mix together all dry crust ingredients.

Add eggs to the butter and sugar, mixture saving about 1 tablespoon of egg to top the crust with before baking. Add in flour mixture in thirds and mix until dough forms a ball (you can do this by hand or in a food processor). Set aside. Note: if you chill the dough, it will be a little easier to press into the pan.

Peel and quarter all of the apples and cut into small, bite-size pieces. Mix in rest of ingredients until apples are well coated.

Grease a 9-inch springform pan. Set aside about 1/4 of the crust, and place the rest in the bottom of the pan. Push out until the bottom and sides are completely covered. Fill with apple mixture and top with rest of crust dough. Brush with egg and sprinkle with brown sugar (optional).

Bake at 400F for about 45-50 minutes.

Want more food inspiration? Check out the rest of our Sunday Recipe series.


Appeltaart

"Koffie met appeltaart", coffee with apple pie, what a traditional Dutch way of celebrating eh. anything! City cafés that want to lure customers in will advertise homemade, overly delicious apple pie on their street signs. Spend a couple of hours at an outdoor market and the smell of freshly baked apple pie will draw you in: don't fight it, but just give in. Sit down at one of the many outdoor terrasjes, or patios, that the cafés have, order a koffie verkeerd or a hot cup of tea, and let yourself be treated to a traditional Dutch apple pie. It's probably one of the first pies that young people learn how to bake and it's one of those delicacies that grandma's are usually very, very good at making.

1 tablespoon lemon juice
1 cup of golden raisins, soaked*
1 tablespoon speculaas spices
2 tablespoons custard powder
2 tablespoons panko or unseasoned breadcrumbs
1/2 cup of sugar

Brushing
1 egg yolk beaten with 1 tablespoon heavy cream
1 tablespoon raw sugar

Butter a 9 inch spring form. Take the dough out of the refrigerator and remove 1/3th of the dough. Roll the rest into a large circle and line the bottom and sides of the form with the dough. Do not crimp. Sprinkle the panko or unseasoned breadcrumbs on the bottom of the dough, and pour in the apple mix. It's okay to push it down so as to fit more, that way the slices will stick better together and make it easier to cut into neat pie slices. Roll the rest of the dough out and cut into 6 wide strips. Place three strips crossing from left to right, the other three from right to left. Press lightly where the strip connects with the pie dough and remove any hangover dough from the rim. Brush the lattice with the egg and cream, and sprinkle the sugar on top of the dough. Bake in an 375 F degree oven for approximately 1 hour.

Let the pie cool on a rack, then cut into generous pieces and serve with a slightly sweetened dollop of whipped cream. Sit back and enjoy your hard labor: you deserved it!

Tip: you can also make five single serve hand pies out of the same amount. The small ones freeze well and are good to have around in case company shows up, or in case you feel like celebrating something. And if you have nothing to celebrate, you could celebrate the fact that you have nothing to celebrate!


Traditional Dutch appeltaart contains a sweet cakey dough on the edges and bottom with a small lattice on the top. The apple slices in appeltaart are flavored with sugar, lemon juice, and cinnamon. Common apple varieties such as Goudreinet, Gala, and Elstar are usually used for making appeltaart recipes because they are crispy and not that sweet.

The delicious bitterballen of Amsterdam is battered in an elegant crunchy breadcrumb coating. They contain a delicious mixture of beef broth, chopped beef, butter, flour, spices, and herbs. Restaurants and food stalls usually serve bitterballen with mustard for dipping. Order a couple of beers and enjoy this Amsterdam delight with it.



Comments:

  1. Brazuru

    Very funny question

  2. Vohn

    Sorry, I deleted this message.

  3. Lynceus

    Congratulations, what words ... wonderful thought

  4. Mekonnen

    Amazing topic, they are very interesting))))

  5. Peredur

    gee in the drive ...

  6. Tarrin

    and it has the analog?

  7. Agiefan

    It is the excellent variant



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